Colorado Rocky Mountain Region: A Geological Cornucopia

August 05, 2008

Boulder, CO, USA - Follow in the footsteps of these 15 field trips from The Geological Society of America and see firsthand a multitude of geological processes, ancient ecosystems, and Paleoindian settlements. Topics include tracking the Yellowstone hotspot; geoarchaeology in Barger Gulch, Colorado, and Clary Ranch, Nebraska; coal, coalbed gas, and coal fires; and a diversity of geology across Colorado and on to Death Valley, the White River Badlands of South Dakota, and the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming.

Compiled by editor Robert G. Raynolds of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science following the 2007 GSA Annual Meeting in Denver, Colorado, USA, these guides illustrate the latest geological and archeological thinking on a variety of current research themes. A series of papers illustrates tectonic and stratigraphic processes through time and space, with discussions of Precambrian structures in western Colorado, Jurassic deposition in south-central Colorado, and near-shore stratigraphic patterns in the Cretaceous strata of the Book Cliffs. One paper reviews potential seismic signatures in Cretaceous and Early Tertiary strata in northern Wyoming and Montana, and another discusses patterns of extension in southern Nevada and adjacent portions of California. Other topics in this well-rounded volume include the history of volcanism and gold mineralization at Cripple Creek, development of coalbed methane resources in the Powder River Basin, a long-lived subsurface coal fire in western Colorado, and the stream ecosystem of Boulder, Colorado's, Boulder Creek.
-end-
Individual copies of the volume may be purchased through the Geological Society of America bookstore at http://rock.geosociety.org/Bookstore/default.asp?oID=0&catID=18&pID=FLD010 or by contacting GSA Sales and Service, gsaservice@geosociety.org.

Book editors of earth science journals/publications may request a review copy by contacting Jeanette Hammann, jhammann@geosociety.org.

Roaming the Rocky Mountains and Environs: Geological Field Trips
Robert G. Raynolds (editor)
Geological Society of America Field Guide 10
2008, 310 pages, US$60.00, GSA member price US$42.00
ISBN 978-0-8137-0010-6

www.geosociety.org

Geological Society of America

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