Nav: Home

Research to improve treatment for millions of lung disease patients

August 05, 2016

New lung scanning technology developed at Monash University has the potential to transform treatment for millions of people with lung disease in Australia and around the world.

A four-dimensional lung scanning platform developed at Monash University by Professor Andreas Fouras has been commercialised by his medical technology company 4Dx. The scanning platform is now giving a Monash-led research team new insights into improved treatment.

Dr Rajeev Samarage, joint lead author from Monash's Laboratory for Dynamic Imaging said the technology would potentially help millions of people.

"Monash has a long record of working with industry to apply deep research into practical commercial applications. With this technology, not only will clinicians have a clearer image of what is happening in the patient's lungs, but it is our aim to detect changes in lung function much earlier than in the past, which will allow clinicians to quantify the effects of treatment by simply comparing measurements from one scan to the next," said Dr Samarage.

Published in the international journal Scientific Reports, the research involved 4Dx, Monash University, the Women's and Children's Hospital South Australia, University of Heidelberg and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Chairman and CEO of 4Dx Professor Fouras said the 4Dx pre-clinical scanner generates high-resolution images of lung-tissue motion and airflow throughout the lungs, which allows investigators to view and measure abnormal function in specific areas of the lung, before a disease progresses and spreads.

"Current tools are out of date and require two or three pieces of diagnostic information to piece together what is happening in someone's lungs. Our game-changing diagnostic tool offers images of the breathing lungs, making it possible to see what is really important - not what they look like - but how they work," Professor Fouras said.

Professor Greg Snell, Head of Lung Transplant Service at the Alfred hospital said it was a significant step.

"This technology has great potential as a new tool for both early diagnosis and management of many very common lung conditions. I think this will be the start of a new way of thinking about diagnostic imaging."

Cystic Fibrosis Victoria CEO Karin Knoester said it was an important tool to help people treat and manage their condition.

"Any tool that can identify damage at an early stage will be able to inform intervention, with the hope of reducing further damage."
-end-


Monash University

Related Lung Disease Articles:

COPD as a lung stem cell disease
Two internationally renowned stem cell researchers at the University of Houston have found an abundance of abnormal stem cells in the lungs of patients who suffer from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), a leading cause of death worldwide.
Scientists discover three genes associated with fatal lung disease
Researchers at the Universities of Leicester and Nottingham have discovered parts of the DNA that put some people at higher risk of an incurable lung disease called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).
Tumor secreted ANGPTL2 facilitates recruitment of neutrophils to the lung to promote lung pre-metastatic niche formation and targeting ANGPTL2 signaling affects metastatic disease
The authors determined that tumor-derived ANGPTL2 stimulates lung epithelial cells, which is essential for primary tumor-induced neutrophil recruitment in lung and subsequent pre-metastatic niche formation.
Lung cancer screening guidelines do not detect disease among first responders
National lung cancer screening guidelines are inadequate to diagnose patients who contract lung cancer from occupational exposure, including first responders, according to a study reported today at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer's North America Conference on Lung Cancer in Chicago.
New drug target discovered for the lung disease PAH
Study suggests that targeting an 'Eyes Absent' protein could lead to better medicine for treating PAH, a deadly lung disease.
In lung disease, crackling and wheezing can be more than just a sign of sickness
Doctors know they're the sounds of lung problems, but it turns out they might be more than symptoms--crackling and wheezing could be the sounds of a disease progressing, a University of Michigan researcher has found.
Lung disease bronchiectasis associated with high frequency of allergy
An international research team led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has found that patients with the lung disease bronchiectasis also often display sensitivity to airborne allergens, and has highlighted the particular role that fungi appear to play.
Mucus, cough and chronic lung disease: New discoveries
As a cold ends, a severe mucus cough starts. Sound familiar?
New genetic pathways linked to severe lung disease in preemies
Scientists from Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H.
Statins associated with improvement of rare lung disease
Researchers have found that cholesterol-lowering statins may improve the conditions of people with a rare lung disease called autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.
More Lung Disease News and Lung Disease Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Clint Smith
The killing of George Floyd by a police officer has sparked massive protests nationwide. This hour, writer and scholar Clint Smith reflects on this moment, through conversation, letters, and poetry.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Nina
Producer Tracie Hunte stumbled into a duet between Nina Simone and the sounds of protest outside her apartment. Then she discovered a performance by Nina on April 7, 1968 - three days after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Tracie talks about what Nina's music, born during another time when our country was facing questions that seemed to have no answer, meant then and why it still resonates today.  Listen to Nina's brother, Samuel Waymon, talk about that April 7th concert here.