Aspirin may help prevent pancreatic cancer

August 06, 2002

MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL(August 6, 2002)--Researchers at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health have found that aspirin use may decrease the incidence of pancreatic cancer, possibly through its anti-inflammatory effects. The study will be published in the Aug. 7 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

For seven years, lead author Kristin Anderson, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the School of Public Health, and her colleagues followed a group of postmenopausal women from Iowa who were part of the Iowa Women's Health Study. These women were asked how often they took aspirin or aspirin-containing products and how often they took other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Pancreatic cancer occurred less frequently among those women who had reported use of aspirin compared to those who had reported they did not use it.

"There is strong evidence to suggest that using aspirin may help in preventing pancreatic cancer, and what's most encouraging is that we've seen these benefits in women who've taken aspirin two to five times per week," said Anderson. "Based on these observations, we estimate that aspirin use might prevent 43 percent of pancreatic cancer cases in women who do not normally use aspirin. While these results are promising, further studies are necessary to learn more about other factors; such as dose, duration, and types of NSAIDs that may help prevent this disease."

Anderson said that before starting an aspirin regime, it's important for persons to consult their physicians. Several previous studies have provided evidence that NSAIDS may lower risk for pancreatic cancer, but this study is the largest to date.
-end-
Contacts:

Kristin Anderson, Ph.D.

Trista Johnson, M.P.H.

DeAnn Lazovich, Ph.D.

Aaron Folsom, M.D.

Tonya Femal, Academic Health Center, (612) 625-2640 (call for pdf copy of the paper)

University of Minnesota

Related Pancreatic Cancer Articles from Brightsurf:

Precision chemo-immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer?
Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal: according to the National Cancer Institute, only about 10 percent of patients remain alive five years after diagnosis.

Nerves keep pancreatic cancer cells from starving
Pancreatic cancer cells avert starvation by signaling to nerves, which grow into dense tumors and secrete nutrients.

Pancreatic cancer: Subtypes with different aggressiveness discovered
To date, no targeted personalized therapies for pancreatic cancer exist.

Bringing the 'sticky' back to pancreatic cancer
A multidisciplinary team of researchers at Japan's Tohoku University has found that a gene regulator, called BACH1, facilitates the spread of pancreatic cancer to other parts of the body.

Does lung damage speed pancreatic cancer?
High levels of CO2 in the body, due to chronic respiratory disorders, may exacerbate pancreatic cancer, making it more aggressive and resistant to therapy.

Scientists have identified the presence of cancer-suppressing cells in pancreatic cancer
Researchers have identified cells containing a protein called Meflin that has a role in restraining the progression of pancreatic cancer.

Pancreatic cancer discovery reveals how the aggressive cancer fuels its growth
A new discovery about pancreatic cancer sheds light on how the cancer fuels its growth and may help explain how promising cancer drugs work -- and for whom they will fail.

Overcoming resistance in pancreatic cancer
In pancreatic cancer cells' struggle to survive, the cells choose alternative routes when their main pathways are blocked by drugs.

Exposing how pancreatic cancer does its dirty work
Pancreatic cancer is a puzzle -- tumors slough off cells into the bloodstream early in the disease, but the tumors themselves have almost no blood vessels in them.

Targeting cell division in pancreatic cancer
Study provides new evidence of synergistic effects of drugs that inhibit cell division and support for further clinical trials.

Read More: Pancreatic Cancer News and Pancreatic Cancer Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.