Aggressive outreach increases organ donation among Hispanic Americans

August 06, 2014

Bottom Line: An outreach campaign that included local media and culturally sensitive educational programs in targeted neighborhoods was associated with an increase in consent rates for organ donation among Hispanic Americans in the Los Angeles area.

Author: Ali Salim, M.D., of Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, and colleagues.

Background: Nearly 20 people die each day waiting for an organ transplant. The organ shortage affects all ethnic groups but is more pronounced in minority populations.

How the Study Was Conducted: The authors examined an aggressive outreach campaign over a five-year period to see how it affected organ donation among Hispanic Americans. The intervention included television and radio campaigns, along with educational programs at high schools, churches and community clinics. The outreach interventions started in 2007 and were finished by 2012. Data collection spans from 2005 and 2011.

Results: The interventions resulted in contact with more than 25,000 people. Of 268 potential donors, 155 total donors (106 of them Hispanic Americans) provided consent for organ donation. The consent rate for Hispanic Americans increased from 56 percent in 2005 to 83 percent in 2011, a level of increase not seen in the non-Hispanic population (67 percent in 2005 to 79 percent in 2011).

Discussion: "We provide strong evidence that an aggressive, targeted outreach effort increases consent rates for organ donation. During the study period, a significant increase in consent rate was observed among the targeted Hispanic American population and was not evident in the population that was not Hispanic. Continued, similar efforts addressing the ongoing organ shortage crisis are warranted."

(JAMA Surgery. Published online August 6, 2014. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2014.1014. Available pre-embargo to the media at http://media.jamanetwork.com.)

Editor's Note: This study was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

Commentary: Hispanic Families, Organ Donation After Tragedy

In a related commentary, Darren Malinoski, M.D., of the Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, writes: "After identifying limitations in knowledge that lessen the intent to donate, the authors developed and implemented a series of educational interventions ranging from high school programs to media campaigns."

"Through these efforts, they have demonstrated an increase in consent rates by the families of potential Hispanic organ donors over time, an increase that was not seen in other ethnic groups," Malinoski continues.

Malinoski notes that despite some limitations of the study "the results are encouraging and similar methods should be used in other regions of the country as well as in different ethnic groups."

(JAMA Surgery. Published online August 6, 2014. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2014.1029. Available pre-embargo to the media at http://media.jamanetwork.com.)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
-end-
Media Advisory: To contact author Ali Salim, M.D., call Jessica Maki at 617-525-6373 or email jmaki3@partners.org. To contact commentary author Darren Malinoski, M.D., call 202-461-7600 or email vapublicaffairs@va.gov.

To place an electronic embedded link to this study in your story The links for this study and commentary will be live at the embargo time: http://archsurg.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?doi=10.1001/jamasurg.2014.1014 and http://archsurg.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?doi=10.1001/jamasurg.2014.1029.

The JAMA Network Journals

Related Organ Donation Articles from Brightsurf:

New study warns of misinformation about opt-out organ donation
A new study has warned of the power of a type of behaviour dubbed the 'lone wolf' effect which could result in people 'opting out' of supporting organ donation.

Study reveals impact of 'soft opt-out' system for organ donation
Research published in Anaesthesia suggests that a 'soft opt-out' system may increase consent rates for organ donation after death, which could boost the number of organs available for transplantation.

Survey finds Americans strongly support organ and tissue donation for research
A strong majority of Americans agree that organ and tissue donation for research contributes to health and medical breakthroughs and acknowledge significant shortfalls for donation.

Kidney paired donation is an excellent option for transplant candidates
An analysis compared transplant recipients who received kidneys through national kidney paired donation and those who received kidneys from other living donors (such as relatives, friends or other paired exchange mechanisms).

Sperm donation to strangers after death should be allowed in the UK, say ethicists
Men in the UK should be allowed to voluntarily donate their sperm after death, if they want to, argue ethicists in an analysis published online in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

You did what with my donation? When donors feel betrayed by charities
When people learn that a charitable contribution they earmarked for a specific project was used for another cause, they feel betrayed -- and often punish the charity, new research from Washington State University indicates.

New study casts doubt on China's organ donation data
The Chinese government may have been systematically misreporting the number of organs it claims it has voluntarily collected since 2010, according to new research published in BMC Medical Ethics.

How opt-out organ donation could affect US waiting lists
Every year in the United States, about 7,500 people die while waiting for an organ transplant, and that number is expected to increase in coming years as demographics shift.

Encouraging critically necessary blood donation among minorities
Better community education and communication are critical for increasing levels of blood donation among minorities, according to a study by researchers at Georgia State University and Georgia Southern University.

Organ and tissue donation in patients considering MAiD: new guidance helps navigate emerging area
A new publication in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) aims to help health care teams navigate clinical and ethical issues that arise when patients choose to donate organs or tissue after medical assistance in dying (MAiD) or withdrawal of life-sustaining measures.

Read More: Organ Donation News and Organ Donation Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.