New tool compares rates of severe pregnancy complications across US hospitals

August 06, 2020

WHAT:

NIH-funded researchers have developed a new system for classifying severe maternal morbidity--life-threatening complications associated with childbirth--across U.S. hospitals. The system relies on patient discharge data to compare rates of severe maternal morbidity between different hospitals and different groups of patients. The study was led by Stephanie A. Leonard, Ph.D., of the Stanford University School of Medicine and appears in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology. Funding was provided in part by NIH's Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and National Institute of Nursing Research.

In the United States, rates of severe maternal morbidity are rising for all women and are worse among racial and ethnic minorities. Researchers studying severe maternal morbidity lack reliable ways to compare rates between groups with different underlying health statuses. According to the study authors, the new scoring system offers an advantage over current approaches. It also relies on U.S. patient discharge data, which is more readily available than electronic health records.

The study team developed and validated their tool using patient discharge data for all 919,546 live births in licensed hospitals in California from 2016 to 2017. The new system also evaluates a woman's risk for severe birth complications independent of her risk from blood transfusions alone, which tend to be less severe than other complications. These two categories match how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other public health professionals track maternal morbidity. With the new tool, scores range from 1 to 59 for severe maternal morbidity and 1 to 36 for non-transfusion severe maternal morbidity. The study team hopes that the new system will aid maternal health research and efforts to improve maternal health across the country.
-end-
ARTICLE:

Leonard, SA, et al. An expanded obstetric comorbidity scoring system for predicting severe maternal morbidity. Obstetrics & Gynecology DOI: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000004022 (2020)

About the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD): NICHD leads research and training to understand human development, improve reproductive health, enhance the lives of children and adolescents, and optimize abilities for all. For more information, visit https://www.nichd.nih.gov.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit https://www.nih.gov.

NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Related Hospitals Articles from Brightsurf:

'Best' hospitals should be required to deliver tobacco treatment
A UCLA-led report published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine exposes what the authors call a weakness in the high-profile 'Best Hospitals Honor Roll' published annually by US News and World Report.

Veterans undergoing elective PCI at community hospitals may have increased chance of death compared to those treated at VA hospitals
Veterans who underwent elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for stable angina at a community facility were at a 33% increased hazard, or chance, of death compared to patients treated within the Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System, according to an analysis of nearly 9,000 veterans published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

How should hospitals ask patients for donations?
A new study looks for the first time at patients' views of hospital fundraising, including legally allowable practices that encourage physicians to work with their hospital's fundraising professionals.

Proximity of hospitals to mass shootings in US
Nontrauma center hospitals were the nearest hospitals to most of the mass shootings (five or more people injured or killed by a gun) that happened in the US in 2019.

'Five star' hospitals often provide fewer services than other hospitals, new data suggests
If you're looking for a top-notch hospital with a wide range of services, narrowing your list to hospitals with a five-star patient experience rating might lead you astray.

Costs of care similar or lower at teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals
Total costs of care are similar or somewhat lower among teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals among Medicare beneficiaries treated for common medical and surgical conditions, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H.

How common, preventable are sepsis-associated deaths in hospitals?
This study estimates how common sepsis-related deaths are in hospitals and how preventable those deaths might be.

Veterans health administration hospitals outperform non-VHA hospitals in most markets
In a new study, researchers from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the White River Junction VA Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont, used the most current publicly available data to compare health outcomes for VA and non-VA hospitals within 121 local healthcare markets that included both a VA medical center and a non-VA hospital.

Tele-ERs can help strengthen rural hospitals
A new study from the University of Iowa finds rural hospitals that use tele-medicine to back up their emergency room health care providers save money and find it easier to recruit new physicians.

Hospitals may take too much of the blame for unplanned readmissions
A new study out of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center reveals that the preventability of readmissions changes over time: readmissions within the first week after discharge are often preventable by the hospital, whereas readmissions later are often related to patients' difficultly accessing outpatient clinics.

Read More: Hospitals News and Hospitals Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.