Expert insights on in vitro alternatives for drug and chemical toxicity testing

August 07, 2014

New Rochelle, NY, August 7, 2014--In vitro toxicity testing is rapidly being adopted in the pharmaceutical, chemical, and cosmetics industries, for example, as an alternative to animal studies to predict adverse health effects of drugs and personal care products and the health consequences of environmental exposures. An insightful Roundtable Discussion focused on how to apply these novel toxicology models to everyday hazard prediction, risk assessment, and decision making in industry is published in the preview issue of the new journal Applied In Vitro Toxicology, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Applied In Vitro Toxicologywebsite.

In the Roundtable Discussion "Comments on How to Make the New Vision of Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century a Reality," Moderator Jim McKim, Editor-in-Chief of Applied In Vitro Toxicology and Founder and CEO, IONTOX, LLC, challenges the panelists to present a realistic view of how far the field has advanced in implementing the strategy put forth in a National Academy of Sciences report to improve toxicity testing.

Panelists Alan Goldberg, Consulting Editor of the Journal, Nicole Kleinstreuer, ILS/National Toxicology Program Interagency Center for Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (Research Triangle Park, NC), Francois Busquet, Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing (Konstanz, Germany), and Melvin Andersen, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences (RTP, NC) participate in an interactive discussion on the use of human cell models combined with high-throughput screening methods to test for toxicity, and the complexity of applying adverse outcome pathways (AOPs). The conversation covers topics ranging from policy issues, challenges related to data interpretation and understanding the information gained from in vitro models, the emergence of three-dimensional tissue culture models that integrate cells from multiple human organs, and the different approaches being used to assess risk from high-dose, short-term exposures compared to exposure to lower concentrations of a chemical over longer periods of time.

"Improved analytical technologies and improvements in human tissue models will allow us to change the animal safety testing paradigm," says Jim McKim.
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About the Journal

Applied In Vitro Toxicology is a new peer-reviewed journal providing the latest research on the application of alternative in vitro testing methods for predicting adverse effects in the pharmaceutical, chemical, and personal care industries. Led by Editor-in-Chief James M. McKim, PhD, DABT, IONTOX, LLC, the Journal addresses important issues facing these diverse industries, including regulatory requirements; the reduction, refinement, and replacement of animal testing; new screening methods; evaluation of new cell and tissue models; and the most appropriate methods for assessing safety and satisfying regulatory demands. The Journal is published quarterly online with Open Access options and in print. A sample issue may be viewed on the Applied In Vitro Toxicology website (http://www.liebertpub.com/aivt).

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Assay and Drug Development Technologies, Human Gene Therapy, and OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology. Its biotechnology trade magazine, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
140 Huguenot St., New Rochelle, NY 10801-5215
http://www.liebertpub.com
Phone: (914) 740-2100
(800) M-LIEBERT
Fax: (914) 740-2101

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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