Harry Atwater and Albert Polman receive the Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics 2014

August 07, 2014

This year's Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics will be awarded to Dr. Harry A. Atwater (Caltech Pasadena, USA) and Dr. Albert Polman (FOM Institute AMOLF, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) for their pioneering achievements in plasmonics and novel nanophotonic routes to ultrahigh-efficiency solar energy conversion. The award, accompanied by US$ 5,000, will be presented on 1 September at the Muziekgebouw in Amsterdam during the "Julius Springer Forum on Applied Physics 2014".

Atwater and Polman have made key contributions to the research area of nanophotonics, the science of light at the nanoscale. In particular, they have pioneered the use of metallic nanostructures that support optical resonances called surface plasmons, to control light at the nanoscale. A key novel insight of their research regards the use of optical nanostructures in photovoltaics. Atwater and Polman have demonstrated how light can be more efficiently absorbed and trapped in solar cells by integrating nanostructures in the solar cell. This enables the fabrication of ultrathin solar cells that can be made at reduced costs, as well as new solar cell architectures with increased efficiency. Atwater and Polman have been collaborators for over 20 years. They have both developed new measurement instruments and fabrication technology that has led to start-up companies.

Harry Atwater is the Howard Hughes Professor of Applied Physics and Materials Science at the California Institute of Technology. His scientific interests have two themes: plasmonics and optical metamaterials as well as photovoltaics and solar energy conversion. Atwater is an early pioneer in nanophotonics and plasmonics, giving the name to the field of plasmonics in 2001. He currently serves as Director of the DOE Energy Frontier Research Center on Light-Matter Interactions in Solar Energy Conversion, and is also Director of the Resnick Institute for Science, Energy and Sustainability at Caltech. He is co-founder and chief technical advisor for Alta Devices, a technology company in Santa Clara, CA.

Albert Polman is the scientific group leader at the FOM Institute AMOLF in Amsterdam, where he heads the program "Light management in new photovoltaic materials." He is professor of Photonic Materials for Photovoltaics at the University of Amsterdam. Polman's research focuses on nanophotonics, with special emphasis on light management in solar cells and optical metamaterials. Polman is co-founder and technical advisor for Delmic, a start-up company that develops a cathodoluminescence imaging spectroscopy instrument developed in Polman's group.
-end-
The Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics recognizes researchers who have made an outstanding and innovative contribution to the fields of applied physics. It has been awarded annually since 1998 by the Editors-in-Chief of the Springer journals Applied Physics A - Materials Science & Processing and Applied Physics B - Lasers and Optics.

Springer Science+Business Media is a leading global scientific, technical and medical publisher, providing researchers in academia, scientific institutions and corporate R&D departments with quality content via innovative information products and services. Springer is also a trusted local-language publisher in Europe - especially in Germany and the Netherlands - primarily for physicians and professionals working in healthcare and road safety education.

About the journal Applied Physics A

http://www.springer.com/journal/00339

Previous winners of the Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics: http://www.springer.com/physics/condensed+matter+physics?SGWID=0-10104-6-791952-0

The award will be presented to Harry A. Atwater and Albert Polman at the Muziekgebouw, Piet Heinkade 1, Amsterdam on 1 September 2014, during the "Julius Springer Forum on Applied Physics" which starts at 8:30 am.

For presentation of an Invited Poster or/and free pre-registration:

Please send an informal e-mail to apa@gwdg.de by 11 August 2014.

Springer

Related Solar Cells Articles from Brightsurf:

Solar cells of the future
Organic solar cells are cheaper to produce and more flexible than their counterparts made of crystalline silicon, but do not offer the same level of efficiency or stability.

A blast of gas for better solar cells
Treating silicon with carbon dioxide gas in plasma processing brings simplicity and control to a key step for making solar cells.

Record efficiency for printed solar cells
A new study reports the highest efficiency ever recorded for full roll-to-roll printed perovskite solar cells.

Next gen solar cells perform better when there's a camera around
A literal ''trick of the light'' can detect imperfections in next-gen solar cells, boosting their efficiency to match that of existing silicon-based versions, researchers have found.

On the trail of organic solar cells' efficiency
Scientists at TU Dresden and Hasselt University in Belgium investigated the physical causes that limit the efficiency of novel solar cells based on organic molecular materials.

Exciting tweaks for organic solar cells
A molecular tweak has improved organic solar cell performance, bringing us closer to cheaper, efficient, and more easily manufactured photovoltaics.

For cheaper solar cells, thinner really is better
Researchers at MIT and at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have outlined a pathway to slashing costs further, this time by slimming down the silicon cells themselves.

Flexible thinking on silicon solar cells
Combining silicon with a highly elastic polymer backing produces solar cells that have record-breaking stretchability and high efficiency.

Perovskite solar cells get an upgrade
Rice University materials scientists find inorganic compounds quench defects in perovskite-based solar cells and expand their tolerance of light, humidity and heat.

Can solar technology kill cancer cells?
Michigan State University scientists have revealed a new way to detect and attack cancer cells using technology traditionally reserved for solar power.

Read More: Solar Cells News and Solar Cells Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.