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Retired pro football and hockey players learn that CTE isn't inevitable

August 07, 2018

Aug. 7, 2018 - An in-depth study of retired football and hockey players--including cognitive, psychological, and brain imaging techniques--finds no increase in the rate of early-onset dementia, reports the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation (JHTR). The official journal of the Brain Injury Association of America, JHTR is published by Wolters Kluwer.

The study may help to alleviate concerns that retired athletes who played contact sports will inevitably develop chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) - a neurodegenerative disorder tied to repeated concussions. "The results underscore an apparent disconnect between public perceptions and evidence-based conclusions about the inevitability of CTE and the potential neurodegenerative effect on former athletes from contact sports," according to an overview paper by Barry Willer, PhD, professor of psychiatry, and John Leddy, MD, medical director of the University at Buffalo Concussion Management Clinic and clinical professor of orthopaedics, both of the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at UB.

In Sample of Retired Contact Athletes, Tests Show Normal Cognitive Function for Age

The unique three-part study included 22 retired athletes, average age 56, who played at least two seasons in the National Hockey League (14 subjects) or National Football League (eight subjects). The athletes participated in three studies, including formal tests for cognitive impairment or dementia; questionnaires assessing executive function and mental health; and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans.

The same examinations were performed in 21 male athletes of similar age who participated in non-contact sports (running or swimming). Most characteristics were similar between groups; the retired contact athletes had lower education, higher body mass index, and more injuries and other health problems.

On subjective questionnaires, the retired hockey and football players perceived themselves to have memory problems. They also rated themselves as having worse executive function (the ability to plan and carry out tasks), compared to the non-contact athletes.

But on standard neuropsychological tests, there were few differences between groups, and no overall differences in memory and executive function. Subjective ratings by spouses were also indistinguishable between groups.

The rate of mild cognitive impairment - a possible precursor to dementia - was also similar between groups. Multimodal MRI scans showed no differences in brain structure and function. Experts in cognitive function and concussion concluded that none of the former athletes had dementia.

Previous studies have suggested high rates of CTE among athletes in contact sports, as well as in other groups including combat veterans. The most recent study found CTE in 110 of 111 former NFL players whose brains were donated for autopsy.

Currently, CTE can be diagnosed only on autopsy. On beginning the study, Dr. Willer and colleagues expected that "some if not most" of the retired contact athletes would have dementia, and that the MRI scans would detect abnormalities consistent with dementia.

"Instead, our advanced brain imaging confirmed our findings that these former professional athletes were functioning according to age in each of the facets being evaluated." Dr. Willer and coauthors write. "It would appear that former athletes who volunteered for our study worried about their mental state and wanted to know, for themselves, whether playing their sport professionally had left them disadvantaged." The researchers took steps to ensure that their study was sensitive to the concerns of the participants; all of the retired athletes chose to receive feedback on their test results.

The researchers concluded that the findings provide some reason for reassurance that dementia and CTE are not inevitable outcomes for athletes who played contact sports at a high level. The results don't argue against the existence of CTE, but do suggest that the risk is not as great as once believed," Dr. Willer and colleagues write. They emphasize the need for further studies to identify the factors, "genetic or otherwise," that explain why some athletes are at higher risk of CTE than others.
-end-
Click here to read "A Preliminary Study of Early-Onset Dementia of Former Professional Football and Hockey Players."

DOI: 10.1097/HTR.0000000000000421

Click here to read "An Exploratory Study of Mild Cognitive Impairment of Retired Professional Contact Sport Athletes."

DOI: 10.1097/HTR.0000000000000420

Click here to read "Multimodal Imaging of Retired Professional Contact Sport Athletes Does Not Provide Evidence of Structural and Functional Brain Damage."

DOI: 10.1097/HTR.0000000000000422

Click here to read "Evaluation of Executive Function and Mental Health in Retired Contact Sport Athletes."

DOI: 10.1097/HTR.0000000000000423

About The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation

The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation is a leading, peer-reviewed resource that provides up-to-date information on the clinical management and rehabilitation of persons with traumatic brain injuries. Six issues each year aspire to the vision of "knowledge informing care" and include a wide range of articles, topical issues, commentaries and special features. It is the official journal of the Brain Injury Association of America.

About the Brain Injury Association of America

The Brain Injury Association of America is the country's oldest and largest nationwide brain injury advocacy organization. Our mission is to advance awareness, research, treatment and education and to improve the quality of life for all individuals impacted by brain injury. Through advocacy, we bring help, hope and healing to millions of individuals living with brain injury, their families and the professionals who serve them.

About Wolters Kluwer

Wolters Kluwer is a global leader in professional information, software solutions, and services for the health, tax & accounting, finance, risk & compliance, and legal sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with specialized technology and services.

Wolters Kluwer, headquartered in the Netherlands, reported 2017 annual revenues of €4.4 billion. The company serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide.

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that engage clinicians, patients, researchers and students with advanced clinical decision support, learning and research and clinical intelligence. For more information about our solutions, visit http://healthclarity.wolterskluwer.com and follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter @WKHealth.

Wolters Kluwer Health

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