Cedars-Sinai immunotherapy expert honored for work in kidney transplantation

August 08, 2014

LOS ANGELES (Aug. 8, 2014) - Ashley Anh Vo, PharmD, administrative director of the Transplant Immunotherapy Program at the Comprehensive Transplant Center at Cedars-Sinai, has been named the 2014 Clinician of Distinction by the American Society of Transplantation for her work in developing anti-rejection drug protocols for patients.

"This prestigious award recognizes Dr.Vo's clinical excellence and the creative scholarship she brings to the field of transplantation," said Andrew S. Klein MD, FACS, MBA, director of the Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Transplant Center. "This is a unique achievement that represents her dedication and tireless work on behalf of transplant patients."

Vo received the award at the recent World Transplant Congress in San Francisco, where Cedars-Sinai kidney transplant clinicians and researchers contributed nearly 30 abstracts and presentations to the international gathering. One of the most highly anticipated presentations involved preliminary research of a new anti-rejection drug known as C1-INH by Stanley C. Jordan, MD, director of kidney transplantation and transplant immunology at Cedars Sinai. Patients in the small trial who received C1-INH after transplantation developed fewer complications.

Vo's research in immunotherapy began in 1994 when she became the transplant pharmacist for Cedars-Sinai and joined a National Institutes of Health investigation headed by Jordan. Since then, Vo and Jordan have collaborated extensively, producing the 2004 landmark study that identified new anti-rejection treatments.

That study tested IVIG, intravenous immunoglobulin, as an effective therapy for lowering a patient's level of HLA antibodies, which can cause a patient's body to reject a transplanted organ. Patients who have been pregnant, been on kidney dialysis or received many blood transfusions often develop HLA antibodies, making it very hard for them to have a successful kidney transplant.

"Dr. Vo has played a key role in our research identifying how IVIG treatment significantly reduces the long amount of time a patient can remain on dialysis, suffering, waiting for a suitable transplant because their HLA antibody levels put them at a high risk of organ rejection," said Jordan. "Her work has been an important asset to the entire field of organ transplantation."
-end-


Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Related Dialysis Articles from Brightsurf:

Immediate dialysis no better than wait-until-necessary approach, researchers find
In the largest international study of its kind, researchers at the University of Alberta and Toronto's St.

Predictors of 5-year mortality in young dialysis patients
The analysis published in NDT [1] evaluated for the first time the association of a large number of demographic, HD treatment and laboratory variables with mortality in patients on chronic hemodialysis treatment since childhood.

COVID-19 mortality alarmingly high in dialysis patients
Analysis of a Spanish experience shows that COVID-19 is frequent in hemodialysis patients, who appear to be at risk for worse outcome.

Survival following switch from urgent in-center hemodialysis to home dialysis
Few patients who start urgent and unplanned dialysis in clinical centers switch to home dialysis.

Is ownership of dialysis facilities associated with access to kidney transplants?
An analysis that included data for nearly 1.5 million patients with end-stage kidney disease looked at whether ownership of dialysis facilities was associated with patients' access to kidney transplants.

At-home dialysis improves quality of life
The rate of people starting voluntary at-home peritoneal dialysis rose from 15% to 34% over 10 years at Kaiser Permanente in Northern California, providing a convenient and safe way to manage advanced-stage kidney disease compared with center-based hemodialysis, according to research published today in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Hydration sensor could improve dialysis
Researchers from MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital have now developed a portable sensor that can accurately measure patients' hydration levels using a technique known as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry.

Uncovering possible role of polyphosphate in dialysis-related amyloidosis
Researchers from Osaka University found that the low concentrations of the naturally occurring biopolymer, polyphosphate (polyP), induces amyloid formation from β2 microglobulin under both acidic and neutral conditions but by different mechanisms.

Study compares dialysis reimbursement around the globe
Dialysis reimbursement policies in most countries are focused on conventional in-center hemodialysis, although home hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis might contribute to quality of life and cost savings.

Elderly patients on dialysis have a high risk of dementia
Older kidney disease patients who are sick enough to require the blood-filtering treatment known as dialysis are at high risk of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, according to a study led by scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Read More: Dialysis News and Dialysis Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.