Nav: Home

Can medical marijuana help treat intractable epilepsy?

August 08, 2018

A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology review examines the potential of medicinal cannabis--or medical marijuana--for helping patients with intractable epilepsy, in which seizures fail to come under control with standard anticonvulsant treatment.

The authors note that cannabidiol--the most researched compound of cannabis--may have modest efficacy and be appropriate for children with severe epilepsy, but attention must be paid to potential side effects and drug interactions. There is no evidence to guide physicians in ranking cannabidiol among current antiepileptic drugs, and it will be important to continue studying its potential through rigorous clinical trials.

"The emergence over the past 12 months of the first successful double-blind randomized controlled trials of cannabidiol is good news for some desperate families of children with severe epilepsy. These studies are a reminder though that this drug is no miracle, and we still have much to learn," said co-author Dr. John Anthony Lawson, of Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick, in Australia.
-end-


Wiley

Related Medical Marijuana Articles:

Medical marijuana laws may affect workers' compensation claims
New research published in Health Economics indicates that after US states passed medical marijuana laws, workers' compensation claims declined.
Medical marijuana cards often sought by existing heavy users
Young adults who seek enrollment in state medical marijuana programs are often those who already use heavily rather than those with mental or physical issues that could be addressed by the drug.
Preliminary medical marijuana research shows promise in lessening opioid
Medical marijuana shows early promise to lessen opioid use and potential abuse, suggests a systematic review of published studies being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting.
Marijuana use among US adults with, without medical conditions
National survey data was used in this study to examine how common marijuana use was among adults with and without medical conditions.
Medical marijuana laws impact use among sexual minorities differently than heterosexuals
Bisexual women had higher rates of past-year and daily marijuana use compared to heterosexual women, and gay/lesbian women were also more likely to report daily marijuana use and past year medical marijuana use than heterosexual women.
Cannabis-related poison control cases in kids, teens in Massachusetts around medical marijuana legal
Rates of marijuana exposure cases in children and teens reported to a poison control center increased after Massachusetts legalized medical marijuana in 2012.
Prescription opioid misuse: What do medical marijuana laws have to do with it?
Researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health report almost no change in nonmedical prescription opioid use or opioid use disorder after states enacted medical marijuana laws.
Young adults who live near medical marijuana dispensaries use more often
Medical marijuana is legal in some form in 33 states, but relatively little is known about the availability of marijuana and use among younger people.
Medical marijuana does not reduce opioid deaths, Stanford study finds
Legalizing medical marijuana does not reduce the rate of fatal opioid overdoses, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
ASCO: Oncologists see benefit of medical marijuana, but not comfortable prescribing
73 percent of oncology providers believe that medical marijuana provides benefits for cancer patients, but only 46 percent are comfortable recommending it.
More Medical Marijuana News and Medical Marijuana Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Making Amends
What makes a true apology? What does it mean to make amends for past mistakes? This hour, TED speakers explore how repairing the wrongs of the past is the first step toward healing for the future. Guests include historian and preservationist Brent Leggs, law professor Martha Minow, librarian Dawn Wacek, and playwright V (formerly Eve Ensler).
Now Playing: Science for the People

#565 The Great Wide Indoors
We're all spending a bit more time indoors this summer than we probably figured. But did you ever stop to think about why the places we live and work as designed the way they are? And how they could be designed better? We're talking with Emily Anthes about her new book "The Great Indoors: The Surprising Science of how Buildings Shape our Behavior, Health and Happiness".
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Third. A TED Talk.
Jad gives a TED talk about his life as a journalist and how Radiolab has evolved over the years. Here's how TED described it:How do you end a story? Host of Radiolab Jad Abumrad tells how his search for an answer led him home to the mountains of Tennessee, where he met an unexpected teacher: Dolly Parton.Jad Nicholas Abumrad is a Lebanese-American radio host, composer and producer. He is the founder of the syndicated public radio program Radiolab, which is broadcast on over 600 radio stations nationwide and is downloaded more than 120 million times a year as a podcast. He also created More Perfect, a podcast that tells the stories behind the Supreme Court's most famous decisions. And most recently, Dolly Parton's America, a nine-episode podcast exploring the life and times of the iconic country music star. Abumrad has received three Peabody Awards and was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2011.