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Was brief dermatologist intervention associated with patient behavior, satisfaction?

August 08, 2018

BottomLine: A short intervention by dermatologists to assess patients' risk of sun exposure, discuss their motivations and barriers regarding sun protection, and offer advice on sun protection options was associated with better sun protection behavior reported by patients and more satisfaction communicating with their dermatologist. This small observational study compared 72 patients who received the Addressing Behavior Change (ABC) intervention with 81 patients in a comparison group over several months.

Authors: Kimberly A. Mallett, Ph.D., of Pennsylvania State University, University Park, and coauthors

To Learn More: The full study is available on the For The Media website.
-end-
For more details and to read the full study, please visit the For The Media website.

(doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2018.2331)

Editor's Note: The study includes a funding/support disclosure. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

To place an electronic embedded link in your story: Link will be live at the embargo time http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamadermatology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamadermatol.2018.2331

JAMA Dermatology

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