Nav: Home

Computational platform optimizes multiple myeloma treatments

August 08, 2018

Masturah Bte Mohd Abdul Rashid and colleagues have developed a new platform that optimizes drug combinations for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), an incurable blood cancer. The computational platform, named QPOP, could one day help improve clinical outcomes in patients with MM that has become resistant to standard therapies. Combination therapies have become a pillar of many cancer treatment plans because they can be more effective than single therapies that only disrupt one molecular pathway. MM - a blood cancer involving malignant plasma cells - is frequently treated with combination therapies that include bortezomib, a first-line drug with promising response rates. However, most MM patients end up relapsing due to the development of resistance against bortezomib, highlighting a need to identify secondary combination treatments that can overcome or forestall therapeutic resistance. Rashid and colleagues developed a tool named the quadratic phenotypic optimization platform (QPOP), which approximates biological responses to therapies using advanced mathematical equations. Unlike conventional models, QPOP doesn't require predetermined information about the mechanisms or composition of a drug to optimize treatments. The authors tested their platform with 128 different combinations of 14 FDA-approved anticancer drugs, and found QPOP was able to identify effective combinations and dosages against bortezomib-resistant MM. A combination of the approved drugs mitomycin C and decitabine decreased tumor size and prolonged survival in a mouse model of bortezomib-resistant MM, suggesting the platform could be a useful tool in efforts to identify promising drug combinations for MM patients.The authors also say that further studies will be needed to determine if QPOP could be applied to the treatment of other blood cancers.
-end-


American Association for the Advancement of Science

Related Multiple Myeloma Articles:

Cardiac toxicity risk factors identified with relapsed multiple myeloma therapy
More than half of patients with relapsed multiple myeloma treated with carfilzomib experienced cardiac issues during treatment, according to a multi-institutional study published June 12, 2019 in Journal of Clinical Oncology.
NEJM publishes bb2121 Phase 1 data in patients with multiple myeloma
Celgene Corporation and bluebird bio announce results from ongoing multicenter Phase 1 study of bb2121 anti-BCMA CAR T cell therapy in patients with multiple myeloma published in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Multiple myeloma: DNA rearrangement may predict poor outcomes
In multiple myeloma, Ig lambda translocations may indicate poor outcomes and resistance to immunomodulatory drugs such as lenalidomide.
Computational platform optimizes multiple myeloma treatments
Masturah Bte Mohd Abdul Rashid and colleagues have developed a new platform that optimizes drug combinations for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), an incurable blood cancer.
Screening high-risk individuals can reduce multiple myeloma mortality
Multiple myeloma is a rare incurable disease that is diagnosed in more than 30,000 people each year in the United States.
More Multiple Myeloma News and Multiple Myeloma Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...