Nav: Home

Inducing labor can help prevent cesarean births

August 08, 2018

GALVESTON, Texas -- A new national study has found that inducing labor in first-time mothers at 39 weeks can help prevent cesarean births and high blood pressure.

The University of Texas Medical Branch participated in the study and Dr. George Saade, chief of obstetrics and the principal investigator at UTMB, said that babies born to women induced at 39 weeks did not have worse outcomes compared to those who were not induced at 39 weeks.

"Actually, they had lower respiratory problems," Saade said. "This is the first large trial ever done on this topic and its result will have a significant impact on the management of pregnancy because it goes against the belief that induction would increase cesarean and lead to worse outcomes."

The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, was conducted through the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network, which is supported by the National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

"First time mothers now should discuss this with their health care provider and decide whether they prefer to be induced at 39 weeks or wait for labor to start on its own," Saade said. "At UTMB, we have already made changes to our practice in order to address this new approach and the likely need for more induction of labor."

The study involved more than 6,100 healthy, first-time expectant mothers at UTMB and 11 other clinical centers across the U.S. About half of the women were randomly assigned to be induced at 39 weeks, while the other half waited for labor to begin naturally. Some women in the latter group were induced after 39 weeks for medical reasons.

While delivering by cesarean section is generally safe for mother and baby, it is a surgical procedure with potential risks and a longer recovery time.

"Nationally, the rates of cesarean births remain high," Saade said. "Most pregnancies after the first cesarean are delivered by cesarean again. So preventing the first cesarean is one of the most effective ways to decrease overall cesarean rates. We hope that this new study will lead to some significant decreases in cesarean rates nationally. We also hope that rates of hypertension in pregnancy, a condition that can lead to severe complications and even death, will decrease too."
-end-


University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Related Cesarean Articles:

Outcomes of birth options after a previous cesarean section
A large cohort study of women who have had one or more previous cesarean sections suggests that attempting a vaginal birth in a subsequent pregnancy is associated with higher health risks to both the mother and the infant than electing for another cesarean.
Reducing exposure to opioids after cesarean delivery
An effort to improve the scheduled cesarean section delivery experience found that changes to preoperative and postoperative processes can lead to reductions in opioid use without increased pain and with faster recovery, according to research from Kaiser Permanente published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology.
Opioid use after vaginal or cesarean delivery among US women
This study used national insurance claims data for about 988,000 women to look at the association between an opioid prescription after a vaginal or cesarean delivery and rates of new persistent opioid use among US women.
Study shows relationship between type of delivery and twins' psychological development
A research team of the University of Malaga (UMA) in the area of Medicine and Psychology has analyzed for the first time the effect of the type of delivery on twins' psychological development and intelligence, demonstrating that cesarean section carries an independent risk in these multiple births.
Cesarean delivery associated with higher risk of severe complications for the mother
Cesarean delivery is associated with a higher risk of severe complications for the mother compared with vaginal delivery, especially in women aged 35 and older, according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
More Cesarean News and Cesarean Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...