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How do the bugs in your gut affect neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases?

August 09, 2016

New Rochelle, NY, August 9, 2016-- A growing body of scientific and medical evidence continues to shed light on the complex interaction between metabolic pathways affected by microrganisms living in the human gut and gene expression, immune function, and inflammation that can contribute to a range of cognitive, psychiatric, and neurodegenerative disorders. The Comprehensive Review article, "Microbiota & Neurological Disorders: A Gut Feeling," published in BioResearch Open Access, a peer-reviewed open access journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, explores this rapidly evolving field of study and how it is advancing toward the development of new therapies and diagnostics across a broad spectrum of indications. The article is available to download on the BioResearch Open Access website.

Walter Moos and coauthors from University of California San Francisco, Boston University and BU School of Medicine (Boston, MA), McGill University (Montreal, Canada), Harvard University (Cambridge, MA), Consulate General of Greece in Boston), Advanced Dental Associates of New England (Woburn, MA), and PhenoMatriX (Boston, MA), discuss the many roles the gut microbiome plays in maintaining human health and survival and how imbalances in the microbiome may be linked to neurological disorders including autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. The researchers describe the emerging use of synthetic biology to develop engineered bacteria ("living pills") with potential therapeutic applications for remodeling the gut microbiota.

"This comprehensive review article provides a full resource of the most up to date information available on the linkage between brain and gut with respect to the human microbiome," says BioResearch Open Access Editor Jane Taylor, PhD, MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Scotland. "It will be of interest to clinicians, synthetic biologists and pharmaceutical chemists alike."
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About the Journal

BioResearch Open Access is a peer-reviewed open access journal led by Editor-in-Chief Robert Lanza, MD, Head of Astellas Global Regenerative Medicine and Chief Scientific Officer, Astellas Institute for Regenerative Medicine (Marlborough, MA), and Editor Jane Taylor, PhD, MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh. The Journal provides a new rapid-publication forum for a broad range of scientific topics including molecular and cellular biology, tissue engineering and biomaterials, bioengineering, regenerative medicine, stem cells, gene therapy, systems biology, genetics, biochemistry, virology, microbiology, and neuroscience. All articles are published within 4 weeks of acceptance and are fully open access and posted on PubMed Central. All journal content is available on the BioResearch Open Access website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many areas of science and biomedical research, including DNA and Cell Biology, Tissue Engineering, Stem Cells and Development, Human Gene Therapy, HGT Methods, and HGT Clinical Development, and AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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