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This week from AGU: Scientists discover cause of Atlantic coast's sea level rise hot spots

August 09, 2017

GeoSpace

Rapidly rising seas: Scientists discover cause of Atlantic coastline's sea level rise hot spots

Sea level rise hot spots -- bursts of accelerated sea rise that last three to five years -- happen along the U.S. East Coast thanks to a one-two punch from naturally occurring climate variations, a new study in Geophysical Research Letters shows.

Tiny ocean waves could make large ice shelves crumble (plus VIDEO)

Small ocean waves could play a bigger role in breaking up ice shelves than tsunamis or other large waves, a new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans suggests. The accompanying video can be found here.

New study details earthquake, flood risk for Eastern European, Central Asian countries

How will future disasters affect countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia? Researchers aiming to answer this question used projected changes in population and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) for 33 countries, along with climate, flood and earthquake risk models, to estimate how each country is affected by flooding and earthquakes now and in the future. Their results were published in a new study in Earth's Future.

70-year record shows long-term trend in atmospheric river activity along U.S. West Coast

A new study in Geophysical Research Letters has identified the climate variation patterns which exert the most influence on atmospheric river activity along the West Coast. One of these patterns is the long-term increasing trend associated with Pacific Ocean warming likely due to human activity.

Eos.org

A test bed for coastal and ocean modeling

An ocean modeling program is improving our ability to predict circulation along the U.S. West Coast, dead zones and other coastal ecosystem responses, and storm surges in island environments.

Research Spotlights

Tracking meteor trails to study the mesosphere

Twelve years of radar data reveal new phenomena in Earth's upper atmosphere, according to a new study in Radio Science.

Blending satellite data to monitor agricultural water use

A new technique that merges data gathered by multiple satellites can be used to monitor agricultural water use and improve water quality assessments around the globe, according to a new study in Water Resources Research.

Auroras may explain an anomaly in Earth's ionosphere

A new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics finds that the ionospheric anomaly over the Weddell Sea is likely influenced by proximity to auroral energy input, rather than by tilting magnetic fields.

A promising new tool for forecasting volcanic hazards

A new model that simulates the behavior of surging ash clouds may help scientists to better predict the hazards associated with the deadliest type of volcanic flows, according to a new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth.

Looking for experts?

The 2017 North American wildfire season has begun. American Geophysical Union experts are available to comment on the science of wildfires and their possible impacts throughout the season, including the connections between climate and wildfires, historical wildfire activity, and wildfire impacts on forest ecosystems. Find experts in other topic areas on the AGU Newsroom site.
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