Nav: Home

Racial gap in survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest narrows

August 09, 2017

There has been a substantial reduction in racial differences in survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest, with a greater improvement in survival among black patients compared with white patients, according to a study published by JAMA Cardiology.

Large racial differences in survival exist for in-hospital cardiac arrest. During the past decade, survival has improved markedly at hospitals participating in Get With the Guidelines-Resuscitation (GWTG-Resuscitation), a national quality improvement program for in-hospital resuscitation. However, whether improved trends in survival have benefited black and white patients equally has remained unknown.

Saket Girotra, M.D., S.M., of the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, and colleagues conducted a study that included 112,139 patients from the GWTG-Resuscitation registry from January 2000 through December 2014 with in-hospital cardiac arrest who were hospitalized in intensive care units or general inpatient units.

Among the patients 27 percent were black and 73 percent were white. Risk-adjusted survival improved over time in black (11.3 percent in 2000 and 21.4 percent in 2014) and white patients (15.8 percent in 2000 and 23.2 percent in 2014, with greater survival improvement among black patients. A reduction in survival differences between black and white patients was attributable to elimination of racial differences in acute resuscitation survival (black individuals: 44.7 percent in 2000 and 64.1 percent in 2014; white individuals: 47.1 percent in 2000 and 64 percent in 2014). Compared with hospitals with fewer black patients, hospitals with a higher proportion of black patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest achieved larger survival gains over time.

The study notes some limitations, including that participation in GWTG-Resuscitation is voluntary, and the results may not be generalizable to nonparticipating hospitals.

"Further understanding of the mechanisms of [the improvement found in this study] could provide novel insights for the elimination of racial differences in survival for other conditions," the authors write.
-end-
For more details and to read the full study, please visit the For The Media website.

(doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2017.2403)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

The JAMA Network Journals

Related Resuscitation Articles:

First-ever analysis of video recorded CPR improves resuscitation outcomes in emergency departments
Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research and North Shore University Hospital pioneer video recording and review process to improve live-saving CPR process.
Hospital critical care resuscitation unit improves patients' chances of survival
Patients with acutely life-threatening health conditions who were treated in the innovative Critical Care Resuscitation Unit (CCRU) received faster treatment and had better health outcomes, including a 36 percent lower risk of dying than those who were transferred from a hospital's emergency department then evaluated and treated in a traditional intensive care unit, according to a recent study in the Journal of Emergency Medicine conducted by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
Randomized trial at music festival shows potential of virtual reality for CPR training
Cardiologists at Radboud university medical center performed a research project during a large music festival called Lowlands, in the Netherlands in August 2019.
Study identifies challenges to neonatal resuscitation outside of hospitals
With about 62,000 babies born outside of hospitals each year, and 1 in 10 newborns needing help to start breathing, emergency medical services (EMS) responders must be ready to give expert newborn resuscitation care.
Decline in sports-related sudden cardiac death linked with rise in bystander resuscitation
Fewer sports-related sudden cardiac arrest victims die nowadays, a trend linked with increased bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), reports a study presented today at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology.(1) The late breaking study also found that the incidence of sudden cardiac arrest during sports has not changed over the last decade.
New nanoparticle combination therapy shows effective resuscitation for massive hemorrhage
Japanese scientists successfully resuscitated rabbits with coagulopathy from severe hemorrhagic shock using hemostatic nanoparticles and oxygen-carrying nanoparticles, which respectively stopped bleeding and delivered oxygen to the systemic tissues and organs.
Rescuers often driven by emotion
Scientists from James Cook University and Royal Life Saving Society -- Australia have found reason can go out the window when people's family members, children and pets are in trouble in the water, and people should be better trained in water rescue skills.
Sex-based bias: Women in Japan are less likely to receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation in public places from bystanders
Japanese women under 65 are less likely to receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by bystanders when they suffer a sudden cardiac arrest in a public location compared to in a residential location, report investigators in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, published by Elsevier.
Emergency resuscitation device increases cardiac arrest survival rate, study reports
When paramedics resuscitated cardiac arrest patients with a new type of breathing tube, their patients were more likely to survive, according to a University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston-led study in today's JAMA.
Timing resuscitation compressions using the song 'La Macarena' or using a smartphone app improve compression quality
New research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia congress in Copenhagen, Denmark shows that the quality of chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can be improved by using either a smartphone app or by using the song 'La Macarena' as a mental memory aid.
More Resuscitation News and Resuscitation Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Speedy Beet
There are few musical moments more well-worn than the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. But in this short, we find out that Beethoven might have made a last-ditch effort to keep his music from ever feeling familiar, to keep pushing his listeners to a kind of psychological limit. Big thanks to our Brooklyn Philharmonic musicians: Deborah Buck and Suzy Perelman on violin, Arash Amini on cello, and Ah Ling Neu on viola. And check out The First Four Notes, Matthew Guerrieri's book on Beethoven's Fifth. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.