Nav: Home

New online tool provides more efficient way for professionals to monitor diet

August 09, 2018

Research carried out to prove the validity of the new myfood24 online diet monitoring tool has shown it is as effective as similar tools already available to health care practitioners, researchers and educators, and more efficient to use.

In 2017, Dietary Assessment Limited was launched as a University of Leeds spin out company to continue the development of myfood24. Users of this tool can record their food and drink intake by selecting items and portion sizes from the extensive database.

The database was created by mapping two datasets: "back of pack" food label data included on most supermarket foods, such as energy, fat, protein and fibre and UK food composition tables which provided information on more than 100 additional nutrients. Reports are generated in in real time and give a comprehensive breakdown of attributes like vitamins and minerals.

The academics who developed myfood24 have carried out the latest round of research to compare its performance with the traditional interviewer-administered dietary survey and to check it was providing the same quality of data for clinicians as traditional surveying and biomarker evidence.

The results of the study have been independently peer reviewed and are published in the academic journal BMC Medicine. More than 200 adults recorded 24 hours of data three times over a month, using myfood24, alongside an existing interviewer-administered dietary assessment method to achieve an estimate of longer-term diet.

The results gathered from both myfood24 and from the standard interview-led method were then assessed against biomarkers taken from urine samples which acted as the gold standard measures for protein, potassium, sodium, sugars, vitamin C, vitamin E and β-carotene. To measure energy, the researchers compared total energy intake to an objective measure of total energy expenditure, using accelerometers.

Professor Janet Cade, Head of the Nutritional Epidemiology Group at the University's School of Food Science and Nutrition, said: "We were pleased to find the evidence showed that myfood24 gave broadly similar answers to the interviewer-based dietary recall with which many NHS staff would be familiar but which takes longer to use and is less efficient for workers.

"We would not expect either of the tools to agree exactly with the biomarkers as these provide very precise measures of nutrient availability in the body and often beyond that which can be achieved by dietary assessments. Proving that myfood24 gives similar levels of detail to long-standing methods of dietary examination opens the prospect of hospitals and GPs adopting it to save time and free up staff to carry out other work."

Dr Darren Greenwood, Senior Lecturer in Biostatistics at the University of Leeds, added: "Our findings show myfood24's results are comparable to the more time-consuming and costly interviewer-based approach across a range of measures. Ultimately, myfood24 was compared to gold standard measures of nutrients in the blood and it passed the test: We have a valid, reliable tool for measuring diet."

myfood24 has already been used to measure people's dietary intake by more than 20 organisations including some in Germany, Denmark and Australia where country-specific versions have been created. It was developed by the researchers to support academic research into dietary intake and diet-related disease.

myfood24 has wide application in research, education and clinical use. A version designed to support classroom learning is currently in use on degree courses in several universities.

The team is currently tailoring myfood24 to clinical settings such as the NHS to be used by health professionals to quickly and accurately measure diet. The aim is to empower patients to better self-manage health conditions, improve their health literacy and lead to the prevention of diet-related disease.

Diet is linked to a wide range of diseases, accurately measuring the nutritional value of an individual's consumption can help to devise healthy eating plans and advance dietary research.
-end-
Additional information

The development and validation of myfood24 was funded by a grant from the Medical Research Council (MRC-G1100235). In early 2017, a spinout company called Dietary Assessment Ltd was created in order to continue the development of myfood24 and respond to a growing range of customer requirements.

For additional information on myfood24 go to http://www.myfood24.org or contact Professor Janet Cade J.E.Cade@leeds.ac.uk

The paper Validity of an online 24-h recall tool (myfood24) for dietary assessment in population studies: comparison with biomarkers and standard interviews is published in BMC Medicine (DOI: 10.1186/s12916-018-1113-8)

Additional authors include: Petra A. Wark, Laura J. Hardie, Gary S. Frost, Nisreen A. Alwan, Michelle Carter, Paul Elliott, Heather E. Ford, Neil Hancock, Michelle A. Morris, Umme Z. Mulla, Essra A. Noorwali, K. Petropoulou, David Murphy, Gregory D. M. Potter, Elio Riboli

For press inquiries please contact Anna Harrison, Press Officer at the University of Leeds, on +44(0)113 343 4196 or a.harrison@leeds.ac.uk

University of Leeds

The University of Leeds is one of the largest higher education institutions in the UK, with more than 33,000 students from more than 150 different countries, and a member of the Russell Group of research-intensive universities.

We are a top ten university for research and impact power in the UK, according to the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, and are in the top 100 of the QS World University Rankings 2019. Additionally, the University was awarded a Gold rating by the Government's Teaching Excellence Framework in 2017, recognising its 'consistently outstanding' teaching and learning provision. Twenty-six of our academics have been awarded National Teaching Fellowships - more than any other institution in England, Northern Ireland and Wales - reflecting the excellence of our teaching. http://www.leeds.ac.uk

University of Leeds

Related Diet Articles:

A plant-based diet boosts weight loss twice as effectively as a traditional diabetes diet
Hana Kahleova, M.D., Ph.D., presented 'The effect of a vegetarian versus conventional hypocaloric diabetic diet on thigh adipose tissue distribution in patients with type 2 diabetes,' at the American Diabetes Association's 77th Scientific Sessions in San Diego on June 12, 2017.
Healthy diet? That depends on your genes
A recently published Cornell University study describes how shifts in the diets of Europeans after the introduction of farming 10,000 years ago led to genetic adaptations that favored the dietary trends of the time.
Diet and global climate change
Eating healthier food could reduce greenhouse gas emissions, says a new study by environmental scientist David Cleveland.
Could a ketogenic diet alleviate gout?
Recent work from the laboratory of Vishwa Deep Dixit, Professor of Comparative Medicine and Immunobiology, has shown that the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate can specifically inhibit the NLRP3 inflammasome.
Fasting-mimicking diet may reverse diabetes
In a study on mice and another study on human pancreatic cells, researchers discover that a scientifically designed fasting diet can trigger the generation of new pancreatic cells to replace dysfunctional ones and stabilize blood glucose.
Time to put TB on a diet!
The tuberculosis bacillus is growing resistant to antibiotics. For this reason, biochemists at UNIGE are attempting to identify the mechanisms that enable the bacterium to reproduce, spread and survive in latent form in our macrophages.
Changes in the diet affect epigenetics via the microbiota
Researchers have known for some time that diet affects the balance of microbes in our bodies, but how that translates into an effect on the host has not been understood.
How your diet can influence your environmental impact
The impact of our dietary choices on the global phosphorus footprint shouldn't be neglected, shows a new study.
Diet and back pain: What's the link?
As part of a collaboration between Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, researchers are exploring the link between diet, obesity-linked type 2 diabetes, and intervertebral disc degeneration.
Your best diet might depend on your genetics
If you've ever seen a friend have good results from a diet but then not been able to match those results yourself, you may not be surprised by new findings in mice that show that diet response is highly individualized.

Related Diet Reading:

The Keto Diet: The Complete Guide to a High-Fat Diet, with More Than 125 Delectable Recipes and 5 Meal Plans to Shed Weight, Heal Your Body, and Regain Confidence
by Leanne Vogel (Author)

The Fast Metabolism Diet: Eat More Food and Lose More Weight
by Haylie Pomroy (Author)

The Complete Ketogenic Diet for Beginners: Your Essential Guide to Living the Keto Lifestyle
by Amy Ramos (Author), Amanda C. Hughes (Foreword)

Simply Keto: A Practical Approach to Health & Weight Loss, with 100+ Easy Low-Carb Recipes
by Suzanne Ryan (Author)

The Longevity Diet: Discover the New Science Behind Stem Cell Activation and Regeneration to Slow Aging, Fight Disease, and Optimize Weight
by Valter Longo (Author)

Dr. Gundry's Diet Evolution: Turn Off the Genes That Are Killing You and Your Waistline
by Steven R. Gundry (Author)

21-Day Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Challenge: Recipes and Workouts for a Slimmer, Healthier You
by Rachel Gregory MS CNS ATC CSCS (Author), Amanda C. Hughes (Author)

The Dash Diet Weight Loss Solution: 2 Weeks to Drop Pounds, Boost Metabolism, and Get Healthy
by Marla Heller (Author)

The Big Book of Ketogenic Diet Cooking: 200 Everyday Recipes and Easy 2-Week Meal Plans for a Healthy Keto Lifestyle
by Jen Fisch (Author), Julie Smith (Foreword)

The Keto Reset Diet: Reboot Your Metabolism in 21 Days and Burn Fat Forever
by Mark Sisson (Author), Brad Kearns (Author)

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Dying Well
Is there a way to talk about death candidly, without fear ... and even with humor? How can we best prepare for it with those we love? This hour, TED speakers explore the beauty of life ... and death. Guests include lawyer Jason Rosenthal, humorist Emily Levine, banker and travel blogger Michelle Knox, mortician Caitlin Doughty, and entrepreneur Lux Narayan.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#492 Flint Water Crisis
This week we dig into the Flint water crisis: what happened, how it got so bad, what turned the tide, what's still left to do, and the mix of science, politics, and activism that are still needed to finish pulling Flint out of the crisis. We spend the hour with Dr Mona Hanna-Attisha, a physician, scientist, activist, the founder and director of the Pediatric Public Health Initiative, and author of the book "What the Eyes Don't See: A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City".