Geologists host tour of San Andreas Fault on Sept. 2nd

August 10, 2004

In a modern-day journey to the center of the Earth, geologists are exploring the structure and evolution of the North American continent at scales from hundreds of kilometers to less than a millimeter - from the structure of a continent, to individual faults, earthquakes and volcanoes. The project is called EarthScope. With approximately $200 million in funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), EarthScope will be developed over the next five years. The project is expected to operate for an additional 15 years. On Sept. 2, scientists studying San Andreas Fault geology will provide a first look at the multiple technologies EarthScope will use to explore the structure and tectonics of North America: ***************************************************************************************************

Who: Scientists from NSF, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the EarthScope Project:What: EarthScope's first look into North American continent geology

When: Thursday, Sept. 2
7:00am to 1:00pm

Where: San Andreas Fault
Depart from Paso Robles Inn,
1103 Spring Street
Paso Robles, California 93466
805-238-2660

***************************************************************************************************

NSF Media Contact: Cheryl Dybas, 703-292-7734, cdybas@nsf.gov

For more information on the EarthScope Project, please see: www.earthscope.org

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering, with an annual budget of nearly $5.58 billion. NSF funds reach all 50 states through grants to nearly 2,000 universities and institutions. Each year, NSF receives about 40,000 competitive requests for funding, and makes about 11,000 new funding awards. The NSF also awards over $200 million in professional and service contracts yearly.

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