Nav: Home

NASA eyes Tropical Storm Kristy's strong core

August 10, 2018

NASA's Aqua satellite found strong storms circling the center of Tropical Storm Kristy.

On Aug. 10. Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with temperature data that showed strong storms.

On Aug. 10 at 4:45 a.m. EDT (0845 UTC) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS, instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Tropical Storm Kristy's cloud top temperatures in infrared light. MODIS found cloud top temperatures of strongest thunderstorms around Kristy's low-level center were as cold as or colder than minus 70 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 56.6 degrees Celsius). Cloud top temperatures that cold indicate strong storms that have the capability to create heavy rain.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC), the center of Tropical Storm Kristy was located near 18.2 degrees north latitude and 129.8 degrees west longitude. Kristy is far from land areas and about 1,325 miles (2,135 km) west of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico.

Kristy is moving toward the north-northeast near 9 mph (15 km/h). A turn toward the north-northeast is expected later today, followed by a turn back to the north with a decrease in forward speed on Saturday, Aug. 11. The estimated minimum central pressure is 991 millibars.

Maximum sustained winds are near 70 mph (110 kph) with higher gusts. While little change in strength is expected today, there is still a chance that Kristy could become briefly become a hurricane this morning. Gradual weakening is expected to begin by tonight and continue through the weekend.
-end-
For updated forecasts on Kristy, visit the NHC website:

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related Hurricane Articles:

2017 hurricane season follows year of extremes
2016 hurricane season started in January and ended 318 days later in late-November.
Study Offers New Insight on Hurricane Intensification
In a new study, researchers from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science showed the first direct observations of hurricane winds warming the ocean surface beneath them due to the interactions with currents from an underlying warm-water whirlpool.
NASA provides a 3-D look at Hurricane Seymour
Hurricane Seymour became a major hurricane on Oct. 25 as the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed the storm's very heavy rainfall and provided a 3-D image of the storm's structure.
NASA sees Hurricane Seymour becoming a major hurricane
Hurricane Seymour was strengthening into a major hurricane in the Eastern Pacific Ocean when the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite passed over it from space.
NASA animation shows Seymour becomes a hurricane
Tropical Depression 20 formed in the Eastern Pacific Ocean on Sunday and by Monday at 11 a.m. it exploded into a hurricane named Seymour.
Hermine becomes a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico
Tropical Storm Hermine officially reached hurricane status on Thursday, Sept.
NASA spies major Hurricane Georgette
Hurricane Georgette is a major hurricane in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
NASA peers into major Hurricane Blas
As NASA satellites gather data on the first major hurricane of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season, Blas continues to hold onto its Category 3 status on the Saffir Simpson Wind Scale.
NASA gets an eyeful of Hurricane Blas
Satellites eyeing powerful Hurricane Blas in the Eastern Pacific Ocean revealed a large eye as the powerful storm continued to move over open waters.
Early use of 'hurricane hunter' data improves hurricane intensity predictions
Data collected via airplane when a hurricane is developing can improve hurricane intensity predictions by up to 15 percent, according to Penn State researchers who have been working with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Hurricane Center to put the new technique into practice.

Related Hurricane Reading:

In the Hurricane's Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown
by Nathaniel Philbrick (Author)

Hurricanes!
by Gail Gibbons (Author)

Hurricane
by David Wiesner (Author)

Hurricanes
by Seymour Simon (Author)

Hurricane (Heaven Hill Generations Book 1)
by Laramie Briscoe Books

Hurricane Season: New from the USA TODAY bestselling author of The Hideaway
by Lauren K. Denton (Author)

Hurricane of Love: My Journey with Beth Wheeler
by Dan Wheeler (Author)

Hurricane Heroes in Texas (Magic Tree House (R))
by Mary Pope Osborne (Author), AG Ford (Illustrator)

Hurricane!
by Jonathan London (Author), Henri Sorensen (Illustrator)

Whose Boat Is This Boat?: Comments That Don't Help in the Aftermath of a Hurricane
by The Staff of The Late Show with Stephen Colbert (Author)

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Hacking The Law
We have a vision of justice as blind, impartial, and fair — but in reality, the law often fails those who need it most. This hour, TED speakers explore radical ways to change the legal system. Guests include lawyer and social justice advocate Robin Steinberg, animal rights lawyer Steven Wise, political activist Brett Hennig, and lawyer and social entrepreneur Vivek Maru.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#495 Earth Science in Space
Some worlds are made of sand. Some are made of water. Some are even made of salt. In science fiction and fantasy, planet can be made of whatever you want. But what does that mean for how the planets themselves work? When in doubt, throw an asteroid at it. This is a live show recorded at the 2018 Dragon Con in Atlanta Georgia. Featuring Travor Valle, Mika McKinnon, David Moscato, Scott Harris, and moderated by our own Bethany Brookshire. Note: The sound isn't as good as we'd hoped but we love the guests and the conversation and we wanted to...