The next frontier in facial plastic, reconstructive surgery

August 11, 2016

Is regenerative medicine the next frontier in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery?

Matthew Q. Miller, M.D., of the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, and coauthors explored that question in a new review article published online by JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

While regenerative medicine isn't rebuilding missing tissue like they do in "Star Trek" movies, it is about unlocking the regenerative potential of allografts and flaps, which are the foundation of surgical reconstruction, the authors write.

In the article, the authors review regenerative medicine techniques in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery, including stem cells, growth factors and synthetic scaffolds; examine platelet-rich plasma; and suggest directions for future studies.

"Regenerative medicine is an exciting field with the potential to change standards of care in FPRS [facial plastic and reconstructive surgery]. This review discusses soft-tissue, cartilaginous and bony regeneration in facial plastic surgery using stem cells, growth factors, PRP [platelet-rich plasma] and/or synthetic scaffolds. Our subspecialty has to continue to clinically investigate these techniques to show whether the new frontiers of regenerative medicine improve outcomes and cost-effectiveness in FPRS while not adding to the risks of treatment," the article concludes.
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(JAMA Facial Plast Surg. Published August 11, 2016. doi:10.1001/jamafacial.2016.0913. Available pre-embargo to the media at http://media.jamanetwork.com.)

Editor's Note: The article contains conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

Media advisory: To contact study corresponding author Matthew Q. Miller, M.D., call Josh Barney 434-906-8864 or email is jdb9a@virginia.edu.

The JAMA Network Journals

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