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Recent study suggests that tooth loss/gum disease may be associated with heart disease

August 12, 2003

Boston, MA, August 12, 2003 - Researchers have believed for years that there may be a relationship between gum disease and heart disease. Now, a study to be published in September by the American Heart Association suggests that a linkage between healthy gums and a healthy heart may exist.

The study, to be published in the September issue of Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association, identified a potential link between tooth loss and atherosclerosis, the buildup of artery-clogging plaque that can lead to stroke or heart attack. Within this study, researchers speculate that tooth loss, frequently caused by gum disease, may spark a series of chemical reactions that cause inflammation throughout the body, contributing to coronary artery disease.

"Half of adults age 18 or older have some evidence of gingivitis, the earliest sign of gum disease," said Dr. Paul Warren, Vice President of Clinical Research for Oral-B. "The good news is that gingivitis can be prevented and even reversed with proper oral care."

In addition to proper diet, daily brushing and flossing, and frequent visits to the dentist, consumers can arm themselves against gum disease with the proper oral care tools. According to an independent study released earlier this year, only power toothbrushes with rotational oscillation technology, such as the Oral-B Professional Care 7000, are demonstrably more effective in removing plaque and reducing gingivitis than manual toothbrushes. No other forms of power toothbrushing -- including "sonic" -- proved to be any better than a manual toothbrush. This study, based on four decades of research, was conducted by the Cochrane Collaboration, a British-based non-profit health research group.

The Oral-B Professional Care 7000 is Oral-B's newest premium power toothbrush. Featuring a unique 3D pulsing/oscillation action that pulses and oscillates to break up plaque and sweep it away, the Oral-B Professional Care 7000 cleans below the gum line to help prevent and even reverse gum disease. The Oral-B Professional Care 7000 is now available in drug, mass, department and specialty retailers in North America at suggested retail prices ranging from $69 to $99. More information can be found by logging on to www.oralb.com.
-end-
Gillette Oral Care
The $5 billion worldwide physical oral care market consists of both manual and power toothbrushes. With its Oral-B products, The Gillette Company is the worldwide leader in both segments. The brand includes manual and power toothbrushes for children and adults, oral irrigators and oral care centers and interdental products such as dental floss. Oral-B manual toothbrushes, the foundation and largest category of The Gillette Company's thriving oral care business, are used by more dentists and consumers than any other brand in the U.S. and many international markets.

Headquartered in Boston, The Gillette Company is the world leader in male grooming, a category that includes blades, razors and shaving preparations. Gillette also holds the number one position worldwide in selected female grooming products, such as wet shaving products and hair epilation devices. In addition, the Company is world leader in alkaline batteries.

Porter Novelli

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