Mercury in the environment

August 12, 2004

Who: The nation's top environmental mercury scientists and land and resource managers

What: 2004 Mercury Workshop

Topic: Science of mercury and resource management

Where: U.S. Geological Survey
12201 Sunrise Valley Dr.
Reston, VA

Directions:http://mac.usgs.gov/mac/visitors/

When: August 17-18, 2004

Why: The large geographic scope and consequences of mercury contamination and the enormous complexity of its interaction with the environment have prompted leading mercury researchers and federal land managers to take a hard look at the problem. Where does mercury come from? What are its effects on wildlife, water, and people? What direction should future research efforts take? Improved information on mercury sources, cycling and toxicity will help land and resource managers understand what can be done to reduce mercury hazards to people and the environment.

Note to Reporters: To schedule an interview with a scientist, call Diane Noserale on 703-648-4333 or AB Wade on 703-648-4483.

Mercury research at USGS: http://minerals.usgs.gov/mercury/
Agenda and speakers are posted on: http://westnilemaps.usgs.gov/mercuryworkshop/agenda.html

The USGS serves the nation by providing reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life.

To receive USGS news releases go to www.usgs.gov/public/list_server.html to subscribe.
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US Geological Survey

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