Study sheds light on late phase of asthma attacks

August 12, 2011

New research led by scientists from Imperial College London explains why around half of people with asthma experience a 'late phase' of symptoms several hours after exposure to allergens. The findings, published in the journal Thorax, could lead to better treatments for the disease.

An estimated 300 million people suffer from asthma, and the prevalence is rising. Symptoms are commonly triggered by allergens in the environment, such as pollen and dust mites. These stimuli can cause the airways to tighten within minutes, causing breathing difficulties which range from mild to severe. Many sufferers also experience a 'late asthmatic response' three to eight hours after exposure to allergens, causing breathing difficulties which can last up to 24 hours.

In the early asthmatic response, the allergen is recognised by mast cells, which release chemical signals that cause the airways to narrow. In contrast, the mechanism behind the late phase has remained unclear.

In research on mice and rats, the Imperial team have now found evidence that the late asthmatic response happens because the allergen triggers sensory nerves in the airways. These nerves activate reflexes which trigger other nerves that release the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which causes the airways to narrow. If the findings translate to humans, it would mean that drugs that block acetylcholine - called anticholinergics - could be used to treat asthma patients that experience late phase responses following exposure to allergens.

Steroids are the main treatments for asthma prescribed now, but they are not effective for all patients. A recent clinical trial involving 210 asthma patients found that the anticholinergic drug tiotropium improved symptoms when added to a steroid inhaler, but the reason for this was unexplained.

"Many asthmatics have symptoms at night after exposure to allergens during the day, but until now we haven't understood how this late response is brought about," said Professor Maria Belvisi, from the National Heart and Lung Institute at Imperial College London, who led the research. "Our study in animals suggests that anticholinergic drugs might help to alleviate these symptoms, and this is supported by the recent clinical data. We are seeking funding to see if these findings are reproduced in proof of concept clinical studies in asthmatics."

The researchers hypothesised that sensory nerves were involved after observing that anaesthesia prevented the late asthmatic response in mice and rats. They succeeded in blocking the late asthmatic response using drugs that block different aspects of sensory nerve cell function, adding further evidence for this idea.

After establishing that sensory nerves detect the allergen, the researchers tested the effect of tiotropium, an anticholinergic drug that is used to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Tiotropium blocks the receptor for acetylcholine, which is released by nerves in the parasympathetic nervous system. Tiotropium also blocked the late asthmatic response, suggesting that parasympathetic nerves cause the airways to constrict.

The study was funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC). Professor Stephen Holgate, MRC funding board chair and an expert on asthma, said: "Unravelling the complex biology of asthma is vitally important, as it is an extremely dangerous condition which exerts lifelong damaging effects. The Medical Research Council is committed to research that opens doors to improving disease resilience, particularly in conditions which attack our body over the long-term. Studies like this are making really important progress and whilst we must always be cautious when taking findings from rodents into humans, these are very interesting and potentially important results."
-end-
For further information please contact:

Sam Wong
Research Media Officer
Imperial College London
Email: sam.wong@imperial.ac.uk
Tel: +44(0)20 7594 2198
Out of hours duty press officer: +44(0)7803 886 248

Notes to editors:

1. Journal reference: K. Raemdonck et al. 'A role for sensory nerves in the late asthmatic response.' Thorax, 2011. doi:10.1136/thoraxjnl-2011-200365

2. About Imperial College London

Consistently rated amongst the world's best universities, Imperial College London is a science-based institution with a reputation for excellence in teaching and research that attracts 14,000 students and 6,000 staff of the highest international quality. Innovative research at the College explores the interface between science, medicine, engineering and business, delivering practical solutions that improve quality of life and the environment - underpinned by a dynamic enterprise culture.

Since its foundation in 1907, Imperial's contributions to society have included the discovery of penicillin, the development of holography and the foundations of fibre optics. This commitment to the application of research for the benefit of all continues today, with current focuses including interdisciplinary collaborations to improve global health, tackle climate change, develop sustainable sources of energy and address security challenges.

In 2007, Imperial College London and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust formed the UK's first Academic Health Science Centre. This unique partnership aims to improve the quality of life of patients and populations by taking new discoveries and translating them into new therapies as quickly as possible.

Website: www.imperial.ac.uk

3. About the Medical Research Council

For almost 100 years the Medical Research Council has improved the health of people in the UK and around the world by supporting the highest quality science. The MRC invests in world-class scientists. It has produced 29 Nobel Prize winners and sustains a flourishing environment for internationally recognised research. The MRC focuses on making an impact and provides the financial muscle and scientific expertise behind medical breakthroughs, including one of the first antibiotics penicillin, the structure of DNA and the lethal link between smoking and cancer. Today MRC funded scientists tackle research into the major health challenges of the 21st century. www.mrc.ac.uk

Imperial College London

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