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Diagnostic imaging can rule out coronary artery disease in patients with atypical chest pain

August 12, 2015

New Rochelle, NY, August 12, 2015--Non-invasive diagnostic imaging can rule out coronary artery disease (CAD) in about 50% of women with atypical chest pain who are at relatively low risk for CAD, while exposing them to only a modest dose of radiation. Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography (CCTA) combined with calcium scoring is a good first-line diagnostic tool for women, in whom CAD often presents as atypical chest pain and reduced radiation exposure to breast tissue is emphasized, according to a new study published in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Women's Health website until September 12, 2015.

In "Ruling Out Coronary Artery Disease in Women with Atypical Chest Pain; Results of Calcium Score Combined with Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography and Associated Radiation Exposure," Friso van der Zant, MD, PhD and coauthors from Medical Center Alkmaar, The Netherlands, evaluated the results of CCTA, a well-established, sensitive method of visualizing non-obstructive coronary artery disease, and calcium scoring to determine the presence of non-calcified plaques in the coronary arteries, among women over an 18-month period. The authors concluded that the ability to exclude a diagnosis of CAD in about half of patients can have a substantial impact on patient management.

"This study suggests that CCTA combined with calcium scoring is a useful diagnostic tool for excluding coronary artery disease in women with atypical chest pain, with minimal concerns about radiation exposure," says Susan G. Kornstein, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Women's Health, Executive Director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Institute for Women's Health, Richmond, VA, and President of the Academy of Women's Health.
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About the Journal

Journal of Women's Health, published monthly, is a core multidisciplinary journal dedicated to the diseases and conditions that hold greater risk for or are more prevalent among women, as well as diseases that present differently in women. The Journal covers the latest advances and clinical applications of new diagnostic procedures and therapeutic protocols for the prevention and management of women's healthcare issues. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Journal of Women's Health website. Journal of Women's Health is the official journal of the Academy of Women's Health and the Society for Women's Health Research.

About the Academy

Academy of Women's Health is an interdisciplinary, international association of physicians, nurses, and other health professionals who work across the broad field of women's health, providing its members with up-to-date advances and options in clinical care that will enable the best outcomes for their women patients. The Academy's focus includes the dissemination of translational research and evidence-based practices for disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of women across the lifespan.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers ) is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Violence and Gender, LGBT Health, Population Health Management, and Breastfeeding Medicine. Its biotechnology trade magazine, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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