Nav: Home

The VesiVax® System: Vaccine development made easy

August 12, 2016

Dr. Qizhi Cathy Yao, professor of surgery, molecular virology and microbiology, and pathology & immunology at Baylor College of Medicine, has been awarded a National Institutes of Health grant to fund a collaborative project with Molecular Express, Inc. The project is based on their virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine strategy.

Virus-like particles have the unique property of inducing strong immune responses but they lack the infectious capacities of the original virus. In preclinical studies, VLPs formed by structural proteins are highly immunogenic. When VLPs are conjugated with VesiVax® formulations containing toll-like receptor agonists, strong humoral and cellular immune responses against various diseases can be generated.

Previously, Yao's lab studied the basic mechanisms of VLP-induced immune responses and other factors that affect these responses. For example, they found that VLP vaccines activate conventional B2 cells and promote B cell differentiation to IgG2a-producing plasma cells. They also found that VLP vaccines travel to the lymph nodes upon immunization and can be directly visualized with optical imaging techniques. In addition, intradermal immunization generates improved responses and might be a preferable delivery route for viral and cancer immunotherapeutic studies involving VLPs.

In this new study, Yao will use the "VesiVax® System: Vaccine Development Made Easy" to develop better adjuvants for many different diseases, including pancreatic cancer and Chagas disease.
-end-
This research was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under award number R44AI094770.

Baylor College of Medicine

Related Immunization Articles:

Malaria vaccine trial samples reveal immune benchmarks for achieving protection
By studying samples from two independent clinical trials of malaria vaccines, Gemma Moncunill and colleagues have linked signatures in the immune system to better vaccine protection from the disease in children and adults.
Passive immunization may slow down SARS-CoV-2 and boost immunity in patients, buying time
The worldwide COVID-19 pandemic has infected more than 4 million people and killed close to 280,000.1 Finding a vaccine has become a global public health priority.
Study results will inform immunization programs globally
The results of the B Part of It study -- the largest meningococcal B herd immunity study ever conducted -- are published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Changed route of immunization dramatically improves efficacy of TB vaccine
Tuberculosis (TB), an ancient disease, is the leading infectious cause of death globally, yet the world's only licensed TB vaccine, Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), was developed a century ago.
HPV immunization program cuts pre-cancer rates by more than half
A school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization program in British Columbia, Canada, is dramatically reducing rates of cervical pre-cancer in B.C. women, according to a new study.
Vaccine report calls for innovative transformation strategies to increase influenza immunization rates in underserved communities
Sustainable Healthy Communities announced the publication of a summary report in Vaccine, the leading peer-reviewed journal focused on immunization science, urging health systems, providers and community stakeholders to implement evidence-based strategies to address racial disparities in influenza immunization.
Advantages of DNA immunization platform for eliciting mAbs in multiple species
Researchers have taken advantage of the benefits of DNA immunization over traditional protein-based immunization to elicit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against challenging targets in three species -- mouse, rabbit, and human models.
Timing of third-trimester maternal Tdap immunization associated with levels of whooping cough antibodies in newborns
Risk of whooping cough (pertussis) is highest in infants too young to have completed their primary immunization series (6 months old or younger) and they are at highest risk of developing life-threatening complications.
Reminding people about vaccinations can increase rates of immunization
Rates of immunization against infectious diseases in children and adults are improving, but under-vaccination remains a problem that results in vaccine-preventable deaths and illnesses.
Change in medical exemptions from immunization after elimination of personal belief exemptions in California
An increase in California in medical exemptions from immunization after elimination of personal belief exemptions suggests that some vaccine-hesitant parents may have located physicians willing to exercise the broader discretion provided by California Senate bill 277 for granting medical exemptions, according to a study published by JAMA.
More Immunization News and Immunization Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Power Of Spaces
How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes, and buildings give us meaning and purpose? This hour, TED speakers explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. Guests include architect Michael Murphy, musician David Byrne, artist Es Devlin, and architect Siamak Hariri.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.