Development of nanosensor capable of detecting herbicide and its target enzyme binding

August 15, 2017

Due to the increased usage of agrochemicals, especially herbicides, in recent decades, high cumulative levels of herbicides have been polluting soil and water sources. Against this background, detecting the presence of these chemicals as contaminants is crucial to effective environmental monitoring. Key to detection efforts are nanobiosensors, devices capable of detecting very small quantities of a specific analyte.

Livia F. Rodrigues and the Nanoneurobiophysics research group from the Federal University of São Carlos, Sorocaba, SP, Brazil, have published their studies on nanomechanical sensing possibilities in NANO: Brief Reports and Reviews. Entitled "Nanomechanical Cantilever-Based Sensor: an Efficient Tool to Measure the Binding Between the Herbicide Mesotrione and 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase", the article explores the nanomechanical capabilities of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilever for use as nanobiosensors for enzyme-herbicide binding detection. Results of tests have revealed the suitability of the employed methods in the precise detection of environmental contaminants.
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For more on the research and the viability of commercial use, readers are invited to access the article article on NANO.

NANO is an international peer-reviewed monthly journal for nanoscience and nanotechnology that presents forefront fundamental research and new emerging topics. It features timely scientific reports of new results and technical breakthroughs and publishes interesting review articles about recent hot issues.

About World Scientific Publishing Co.

World Scientific Publishing is a leading independent publisher of books and journals for the scholarly, research, professional and educational communities. The company publishes about 600 books annually and about 130 journals in various fields. World Scientific collaborates with prestigious organizations like the Nobel Foundation and US National Academies Press to bring high quality academic and professional content to researchers and academics worldwide. To find out more about World Scientific, please visit http://www.worldscientific.com.

For more information, contact Judy Yeo at jlyeo@wspc.com.

World Scientific

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