Families continue to enjoy TV together -- but potentially ruin it for each other

August 15, 2019

TV companies battling to preserve the shared experience of scheduled TV viewing in an era of 24/7 streaming and personalised viewing need more than binge-watching contracts and no-sleeping agreements to keep customers.

Recently, Netflix introduced a binge-watching contract for couples and families to regulate the way they watch TV together. However, new research from Lancaster University, the University of Warwick and Relational Economics Ltd suggests streaming and subscription TV providers need to consider several other factors to ensure their services provide value to customers.

The study of UK households who subscribe to digital and satellite TV services - which accounted for 60% of UK households in 2018 - is published in the Journal of Business Research.

Lead author Dr Helen Bruce, of Lancaster University Management School's Marketing Department, said: "From our research, we found families value more than just watching TV together, though the ability to do so - and to customise those experiences - remains extremely important, and a key reason why families continue to spend often significant sums of money each month on TV subscriptions.

"In fact, our research shows that families who work together to choose which TV packages (and elements thereof) to have within their home, who learn together how to use the ever-evolving technologies, who plan what and when they will watch together, and who meaningfully discuss their viewing experiences, will ultimately derive more value from their subscription.

"However, value can be destroyed where family members don't or can't master the various technologies, and where family members don't have equal ownership and control over the TV and its benefits.

"Perhaps more importantly for TV subscription companies trying to maintain a position within a household, value can be destroyed where the actions of one family member are detrimental to others. For instance, a person might disrupt family viewing by talking loudly, delete recorded shows that someone else wanted to watch, or make disparaging comments about another party's tastes in TV shows.

"Firms need to think about how they can facilitate collaboration among families in their use of subscription TV. For example, there is the potential to use technologies such as Alexa to identify areas of value destruction and to intervene - for instance, by detecting when one person regularly talks during a certain programme, and setting up a recording, so nothing is missed."

Dr Bruce added: "Service providers need to provide resources that are easily integrated into consumers' lives, as well as providing reliability and quality. They also need to respond to common problems, where patterns of behaviour which cause difficulties - and thus a loss of value - are repeated across users."
-end-


Lancaster University

Related Science Articles from Brightsurf:

75 science societies urge the education department to base Title IX sexual harassment regulations on evidence and science
The American Educational Research Association (AERA) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) today led 75 scientific societies in submitting comments on the US Department of Education's proposed changes to Title IX regulations.

Science/Science Careers' survey ranks top biotech, biopharma, and pharma employers
The Science and Science Careers' 2018 annual Top Employers Survey polled employees in the biotechnology, biopharmaceutical, pharmaceutical, and related industries to determine the 20 best employers in these industries as well as their driving characteristics.

Science in the palm of your hand: How citizen science transforms passive learners
Citizen science projects can engage even children who previously were not interested in science.

Applied science may yield more translational research publications than basic science
While translational research can happen at any stage of the research process, a recent investigation of behavioral and social science research awards granted by the NIH between 2008 and 2014 revealed that applied science yielded a higher volume of translational research publications than basic science, according to a study published May 9, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Xueying Han from the Science and Technology Policy Institute, USA, and colleagues.

Prominent academics, including Salk's Thomas Albright, call for more science in forensic science
Six scientists who recently served on the National Commission on Forensic Science are calling on the scientific community at large to advocate for increased research and financial support of forensic science as well as the introduction of empirical testing requirements to ensure the validity of outcomes.

World Science Forum 2017 Jordan issues Science for Peace Declaration
On behalf of the coordinating organizations responsible for delivering the World Science Forum Jordan, the concluding Science for Peace Declaration issued at the Dead Sea represents a global call for action to science and society to build a future that promises greater equality, security and opportunity for all, and in which science plays an increasingly prominent role as an enabler of fair and sustainable development.

PETA science group promotes animal-free science at society of toxicology conference
The PETA International Science Consortium Ltd. is presenting two posters on animal-free methods for testing inhalation toxicity at the 56th annual Society of Toxicology (SOT) meeting March 12 to 16, 2017, in Baltimore, Maryland.

Citizen Science in the Digital Age: Rhetoric, Science and Public Engagement
James Wynn's timely investigation highlights scientific studies grounded in publicly gathered data and probes the rhetoric these studies employ.

Science/Science Careers' survey ranks top biotech, pharma, and biopharma employers
The Science and Science Careers' 2016 annual Top Employers Survey polled employees in the biotechnology, biopharmaceutical, pharmaceutical, and related industries to determine the 20 best employers in these industries as well as their driving characteristics.

Three natural science professors win TJ Park Science Fellowship
Professor Jung-Min Kee (Department of Chemistry, UNIST), Professor Kyudong Choi (Department of Mathematical Sciences, UNIST), and Professor Kwanpyo Kim (Department of Physics, UNIST) are the recipients of the Cheong-Am (TJ Park) Science Fellowship of the year 2016.

Read More: Science News and Science Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.