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Epicardial coronary artery abnormalities that do not result in myocardial ischemia

August 15, 2019

What to Do with Epicardial Coronary Artery Abnormalities That do not Result in Myocardial Ischemia?

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications volume 4, issue 2, pp. 109-111 ; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2017.0067 C. Richard Conti from the University of Florida Medical School, Gainesville, FL, USA considers epicardial coronary artery abnormalities that do not result in myocardial ischemia.

When epicardial arteries with minimal CAD do not limit flow are found at coronary angiography, all cardiologists agree that aggressive risk factor modification and use of appropriate drugs are warranted. Some consider plaque sealing of minor coronary lesions with balloon angioplasty to prevent future infarction. Others believe that a coronary lesion that does not cause ischemia should not have the plaque sealed but should have FFR and the non-ischemia producing steno-sis should be treated with aggressive risk factor modification (DEFER study). Evidence based data e.g. DEFER, relates to populations, not the individual. Thus these data provide guidelines, which are suggestions for decision making. The weight of evidence favors angioplasty/stent for epicardial vessels that result in myocardial ischemia. Sealing of non-flow limiting plaques with angioplasty must await further information derived from invasive and non invasive studies.
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Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications

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