Nav: Home

Chronic pain linked to partners of people with depression

August 16, 2016

Partners of people with depression are more likely to suffer from chronic pain, research has found.

The study shows that the two conditions share common causes - some of which are genetic whilst other causes originate from the environment that partners share.

Experts say their findings shed new light on the illnesses and could one day help to develop better diagnostic tests and treatments.

Researchers led by the University of Edinburgh studied information from more than 100,000 people taking part in large nationwide health studies.

The team analysed people's genetic background as well as details about their experiences of pain and depression.

Their findings revealed that chronic pain is caused partly by someone's genetic make-up and partly by as yet unidentified risk factors that are shared jointly by partners or spouses.

They also identified significant overlaps between the risk factors for chronic pain and depression.

Chronic pain is a common cause of disability but little is known about what causes it. Scientists say the research will bring a new understanding of why some people suffer from the condition and not others.

The research used data from the Generation Scotland and UK Biobank projects - major studies investigating genetic links to health conditions.

Researchers from the Universities of Edinburgh, Dundee, Aberdeen and Glasgow collaborated on the project. The study, published in the journal PLOS Medicine, was funded by Wellcome.

Professor Andrew McIntosh, Chair of Biological Psychiatry at the University of Edinburgh, said: "We hope our research will encourage people to think about the relationship between chronic pain and depression and whether physical and mental illnesses are as separate as some believe."
-end-


University of Edinburgh

Related Depression Articles:

Tackling depression by changing the way you think
A thought is a thought. It does not reflect reality.
How depression can muddle thinking
Depression is associated with sadness, fatigue and a lack of motivation.
Neuroimaging categorizes 4 depression subtypes
Patients with depression can be categorized into four unique subtypes defined by distinct patterns of abnormal connectivity in the brain, according to new research from Weill Cornell Medicine.
Studies suggest inflammatory cytokines are associated with depression and psychosis, and that anti-cytokine treatment can reduce depression symptoms
Studies presented at this year's International Early Psychosis Association meeting in Milan, Italy, (Oct.
Is depression in parents, grandparents linked to grandchildren's depression?
Having both parents and grandparents with major depressive disorder was associated with higher risk of MDD for grandchildren, which could help identify those who may benefit from early intervention, according to a study published online by JAMA Psychiatry.
More Depression News and Depression Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans
More than test scores or good grades — what do kids need to prepare them for the future? This hour, guest host Manoush Zomorodi and TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, in and out of the classroom. Guests include educators Olympia Della Flora and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#535 Superior
Apologies for the delay getting this week's episode out! A technical glitch slowed us down, but all is once again well. This week, we look at the often troubling intertwining of science and race: its long history, its ability to persist even during periods of disrepute, and the current forms it takes as it resurfaces, leveraging the internet and nationalism to buoy itself. We speak with Angela Saini, independent journalist and author of the new book "Superior: The Return of Race Science", about where race science went and how it's coming back.