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New guidelines for managing hyperthyroidism and other causes of thyrotoxicosis

August 17, 2016

New Rochelle, NY, August 17, 2016-- New evidence-based recommendations from the American Thyroid Association (ATA) provide guidance to clinicians in the management of patients with all forms of thyrotoxicosis (excessively high thyroid hormone activity), including hyperthyroidism. Appropriate treatment of thyrotoxicosis requires an accurate diagnosis, and the 124 recommendations presented in the new Guidelines help define current best practices for patient evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment. The Guidelines, published in Thyroid, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers and the official journal of the ATA, are available free on the Thyroid website.

The "2016 American Thyroid Association Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management of Hyperthyroidism and Other Causes of Thyrotoxicosis" were coauthored by an international task force of expert clinicians and researchers in the field of thyroidology. Led by Chair Douglas Ross, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, the task force provides a solid foundation of knowledge on the scope, potential causes, and clinical consequences of thyrotoxicosis. The Guidelines include recommendations on how to evaluate patients and diagnose and manage the different types of disease, how to handle thyrotoxicosis in pregnancy, and how to select and implement the various treatment options such as surgery, radioactivity, and antithyroid drugs.

"These ATA guidelines, written by an international and multidisciplinary task force, provide a significant update compared to the previous version published in 2011 because they integrate recent studies and developments in practice trends," says Peter A. Kopp, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Thyroid and Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Molecular Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago. "They form a detailed and balanced framework for the diagnosis and management of patients with different etiologies of thyrotoxicosis that is based on the currently available evidence."

"This is a carefully prepared, well thought out, and comprehensive set of guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of hyperthyroidism. An invaluable resource for residents, internists, and endocrinologists to have at hand," says Antonio C. Bianco, MD, PhD, President of the ATA, President of Rush University Medical Group, and Vice Dean of Clinical Affairs for Rush Medical College.

"Some of the highlights of the 2016 guidelines are the changing paradigms for the evaluation and management of Graves' disease with more reliance upon the measurement of thyrotropin receptor antibodies, new approaches for managing hyperthyroid patients desiring pregnancy, new approaches in the management of calcium metabolism prior to thyroid surgery, and a critical re-evaluation of the long-term toxicity of antithyroid drugs," says Dr. Ross. "Sections on less common causes of thyrotoxicosis have been expanded."
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About the Journal

Thyroid, the official journal of the American Thyroid Association, is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published monthly online with open access options and in print. The Journal publishes original articles and timely reviews that reflect the rapidly advancing changes in our understanding of thyroid physiology and pathology, from the molecular biology of the cell to clinical management of thyroid disorders. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Thyroid website. The complete Thyroid Journal Program includes the highly valued abstract and commentary publication Clinical Thyroidology, led by Editor-in-Chief Jerome M. Hershman, MD and published monthly, and the groundbreaking videojournal companion VideoEndocrinology, led by Editor Gerard Doherty, MD and published quarterly. Complete tables of content and sample issues may be viewed on the Thyroid website.

About the Society

The American Thyroid Association (ATA) is the leading worldwide organization dedicated to the advancement, understanding, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of thyroid disorders and thyroid cancer. ATA is an international multi-discipline medical society with over 1,700 endocrinologists, surgeons, oncologists from 43 countries around the world. Celebrating its 93rd anniversary, the ATA delivers its mission--of being devoted to thyroid biology and to the treatment of thyroid disease through excellence in research, clinical care, education, and public health--through several key endeavors: the publication of highly regarded professional journals, Thyroid, Clinical Thyroidology, and VideoEndocrinology; annual scientific meetings; biennial clinical and research symposia; research grant programs for young investigators, support of online professional, public and patient educational programs; and the development of guidelines for clinical management of thyroid disease and thyroid cancer. The ATA promotes thyroid awareness and information through its online Clinical Thyroidology for the Public (distributed free of charge to over 11,000 patients and public subscribers) and extensive, authoritative explanations of thyroid disease and thyroid cancer in both English and Spanish. The ATA websiteserves as the clinical resource for patients and the public who look for reliable information on the Internet.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, Journal of Women's Health, and Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's more than 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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