Nav: Home

Homelessness linked to poor antipsychotic medication adherence

August 17, 2016

SFU health sciences researcher Stefanie Rezansoff has published a new study on the treatment of serious mental illnesses among people who are homeless. This is the first study to investigate adherence to antipsychotic medication in this population.

She found only 12 per cent of the 290 individuals studied were adherent to their medications at the level needed to be effective. This is despite having full drug coverage and high access to pharmacies.

"Treatment protocols recommend that patients receive these medications continuously once they're initiated, but this can be difficult to ensure when people are precariously housed," says Rezansoff. "There's a strong link between low adherence and long-term homelessness."

Serious mental illnesses such as schizophrenia are overrepresented among homeless people. When symptoms are not effectively managed, individuals are at a higher risk of hospitalization, arrest, victimization and even suicide.

The research team is currently investigating interventions to improve adherence to antipsychotic medications. Possible interventions include supported housing, prescribing long-acting injections, and initiating regular and frequent contact between patients and primary healthcare providers.
-end-
Rezansoff, a PhD candidate, conducts her research under SFU health sciences professor Julian Somers in SFU's Somers Research Group. She receives funding from the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Study: http://at.sfu.ca/jwPHaK

Simon Fraser University

Related Homeless Articles:

One in two homeless people may have experienced a head injury in their lifetime
People who are homeless experience a disproportionately high lifetime prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI), according to a new UBC-led study published today in The Lancet Public Health.
Study-Disparities in care among homeless adults hospitalized for cardiovascular conditions
In a new retrospective study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine, a team of researchers led by Rishi Wadhera, MD, MPP, MPhil, an investigator in the Smith Center for Outcomes Research in Cardiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), found that there are indeed striking disparities in in-hospital care and mortality between homeless and non-homeless adults.
Most Europeans want governments to help the homeless
The majority of European citizens hold positive attitudes toward people who are homeless and wish that European states would do more to reduce it, according to a study published Sept.
Study of newly homeless ED patients finds multiple contributors to homelessness
A qualitative study of recently homeless emergency department (ED) patients found multiple contributors to homelessness that can inform future homelessness prevention interventions.
Homeless people are denied basic health care, research finds
A study led by the University of Birmingham, UK, has painted a shaming picture of neglect and discrimination shown towards the homeless when accessing UK health services.
Study highlights need for integrated healthcare for the homeless
A University of Birmingham study has found alarming evidence of severe mental health problems, substance dependence and alcohol misuse amongst homeless population.
Study counters narrative that street homeless are 'service resistant'
A team of researchers finds that personal resistance isn't the reason many street persons reject outreach workers' offers of shelter.
Smaller city effort to aid chronically homeless can be successful
Los Angeles County has the nation's largest number of unsheltered homeless people, but the problem affects communities in the region differently.
Study examines primary drivers of increased hospitalizations of homeless individuals
A new study led by investigators from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Brigham and Women's Hospital examines patterns, causes and outcomes of acute hospitalizations between 2007 and 2013 for homeless individuals and non-homeless control groups in three populous and diverse U.S. states: Florida, California and Massachusetts.
Hospitalizations for homeless individuals are on the rise
Data from a new retrospective cohort study suggest a rise in acute hospital use among homeless individuals for mental illness and substance use disorder.
More Homeless News and Homeless Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.