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Pope Francis to visit ESC Congress 2016 in Rome

August 18, 2016

Rome, 18 August 2016 - The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) is proud to announce that His Holiness Pope Francis will visit ESC Congress 2016, the largest scientific summit on cardiovascular medicine.

More than thirty-thousand health care professionals from around the world are expected to attend this year's event in Rome. Pope Francis will address the gathering at the conclusion of the five-day congress on Wednesday, 31 August 2016.

"The Pope's visit is recognition of the significant efforts by the European Society of Cardiology and medical professionals worldwide to advance prevention, diagnosis and treatment of heart disease," said ESC President, Professor Fausto Pinto. "We are honored to welcome Pope Francis."

According to the World Health Organization, cardiovascular disease is the world's leading cause of mortality. It is responsible for more than 17 million deaths a year -- or 31% of all deaths globally -- according to the most recent data.

The European Society of Cardiology brings together health care professionals from more than 120 countries to advance cardiovascular medicine and help people lead, longer healthier lives. ESC Congress, held annually at the end of August, presents more than 6,000 scientific abstracts, identifying the latest discoveries and breakthroughs in the fight against heart disease.
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European Society of Cardiology

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