Researchers Begin Drug Trial In Hope Of Finding New Ways To Treat Acute Kidney Failure

August 18, 1998

DALLAS, Texas.--Each year 20 million Americans are affected by kidney and urological diseases, while 150,000 develop acute kidney failure. The current treatment for kidney failure is dialysis, a sometimes painful and always costly stop-gap measure that is not a cure, or kidney transplant.

Dr. Robert Star, a UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas researcher, has been awarded $40,000 per year for the next three years to study a drug that has reversed the onset of acute kidney failure in animals.

"With the mortality rate being anywhere from 25 percent to 50 percent for individuals who develop acute renal failure, new methods for detecting, preventing and treating acute renal failure must be sought," said Star, associate professor of internal medicine.

The National Kidney Foundation estimates there are 53,000 Americans waiting for life- saving transplants, and 10 people die each day while waiting. Star's research involving the drug alpha-MSH could reduce the disparity of organ allocation in this country that results in unnecessary deaths. "We have found that alpha-MSH treatment significantly reduced renal damage and inhibited the disease at a number of different steps even in transplanted kidneys," Star said.

"This means that a less-than-perfect kidney could be transplanted. It could help increase the number of available kidneys, which would reduce the waiting list for recipients considerably," Star said.

Phase I of the study, funded by the Baxter Extramural Grant Program, will evaluate the drug in four groups of people: dialysis patients, kidney-transplant patients, patients that already have acute renal failure and people without kidney damage.

Star also has developed a new way of testing kidney function. The conventional method can take up to three hours but is not practical for patients with acute kidney failure, which can strike within days or even hours.

"This new procedure measures kidney function in 45 minutes and allows the patient to receive results within one or two hours," Star said.

Researchers collaborating with Star on the alpha-MSH trial from UT Southwestern include: Dr. Khashayar Sakhaee, professor of internal medicine and the BeautiControl Cosmetics Inc. Professor in Mineral Metabolism and Osteoporosis, and Dr. John Middleton, associate professor of internal medicine. Dr. Andrew Fenves from Baylor University Medical Center and Dr. Karl Brinker from Methodist Medical Center also participated in the study.

This news release is available on our World Wide Web home page at http://www.swmed.edu/home_pages/news/. To automatically receive news releases from UT Southwestern via e-mail, send a message to UTSWNEWS-REQUEST@listserv.swmed.edu. Leave the subject line blank and in the text box, type SUB UTSWNEWS
-end-


UT Southwestern Medical Center

Related Dialysis Articles from Brightsurf:

Immediate dialysis no better than wait-until-necessary approach, researchers find
In the largest international study of its kind, researchers at the University of Alberta and Toronto's St.

Predictors of 5-year mortality in young dialysis patients
The analysis published in NDT [1] evaluated for the first time the association of a large number of demographic, HD treatment and laboratory variables with mortality in patients on chronic hemodialysis treatment since childhood.

COVID-19 mortality alarmingly high in dialysis patients
Analysis of a Spanish experience shows that COVID-19 is frequent in hemodialysis patients, who appear to be at risk for worse outcome.

Survival following switch from urgent in-center hemodialysis to home dialysis
Few patients who start urgent and unplanned dialysis in clinical centers switch to home dialysis.

Is ownership of dialysis facilities associated with access to kidney transplants?
An analysis that included data for nearly 1.5 million patients with end-stage kidney disease looked at whether ownership of dialysis facilities was associated with patients' access to kidney transplants.

At-home dialysis improves quality of life
The rate of people starting voluntary at-home peritoneal dialysis rose from 15% to 34% over 10 years at Kaiser Permanente in Northern California, providing a convenient and safe way to manage advanced-stage kidney disease compared with center-based hemodialysis, according to research published today in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Hydration sensor could improve dialysis
Researchers from MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital have now developed a portable sensor that can accurately measure patients' hydration levels using a technique known as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry.

Uncovering possible role of polyphosphate in dialysis-related amyloidosis
Researchers from Osaka University found that the low concentrations of the naturally occurring biopolymer, polyphosphate (polyP), induces amyloid formation from β2 microglobulin under both acidic and neutral conditions but by different mechanisms.

Study compares dialysis reimbursement around the globe
Dialysis reimbursement policies in most countries are focused on conventional in-center hemodialysis, although home hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis might contribute to quality of life and cost savings.

Elderly patients on dialysis have a high risk of dementia
Older kidney disease patients who are sick enough to require the blood-filtering treatment known as dialysis are at high risk of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, according to a study led by scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Read More: Dialysis News and Dialysis Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.