'Cold linac' commissioning major step for ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source

August 19, 2005

OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Aug. 19, 2005 -- The Spallation Neutron Source at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has met a crucial milestone on its way to completion in June 2006 -- operation of the superconducting section of its linear accelerator.

The SNS linac has two sections: a room-temperature, or warm, section, which completed its commissioning last January, and a superconducting, or cold, section, which operates at temperatures hundreds of degrees below zero. The cold linac provides the bulk of the power that drives the linac, and has already achieved an energy level of 865 MeV, which is about 75 percent of the speed of light. The SNS linac is the world's first high energy, high power linac to apply superconducting technology to the acceleration of protons.

"The successful operation of the cold linac is a major step toward the 2006 completion of the SNS and demonstrates the success of the collaboration of national labs in keeping the project on time, on budget and on scope. It represents, technically, one of the most complex systems of the SNS facility," said Thom Mason, ORNL's associate lab director for the SNS.

"This successful test is just another indicator of the outstanding team of men and women that ORNL has brought together to build and operate the SNS facility. They can be justifiably proud of this accomplishment," said Les Price, DOE's project director for the SNS.

The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Virginia, part of the team of six DOE national laboratories collaborating on the DOE Office of Science project, was responsible for the superconducting linac and its refrigeration system. Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico provided the radio-frequency systems that drive the linac. The other DOE national laboratories supporting ORNL in the SNS collaboration are Argonne, Lawrence Berkeley, and Brookhaven.

"Jefferson Lab congratulates the Oak Ridge SNS team on this major milestone," said Claus Rode, SNS project manager for Jefferson Lab. "The SNS project was a challenging five-year effort that used all of Jefferson Lab's expertise in superconducting radiofrequency technology."

SNS will produce neutrons by accelerating a pulsed beam of high-energy protons down the 1,000-foot linac, compressing each pulse to high intensity, and delivering them to a liquid mercury target where neutrons are produced in a process called "spallation."

SNS will increase the intensity of pulsed neutrons available to researchers nearly tenfold, providing higher quality images molecular structures and motion. Together, ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor and SNS will represent the world's foremost facilities for neutron scattering, a technique pioneered at ORNL shortly after World War II.

When completed next year, SNS will become the world's leading research facility for study of the structure and dynamics of materials using neutrons. It will operate as a user facility that will enable researchers from the United States and abroad to study the science of materials that forms the basis for new technologies in telecommunications, manufacturing, transportation, information technology, biotechnology and health.
-end-
Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a multiprogram laboratory managed for the Department of Energy by UT-Battelle.

NOTE TO EDITORS:
You may read other press releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory or learn more about the lab at http://www.ornl.gov/news.

DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Related Superconducting Articles from Brightsurf:

Rochester researchers synthesize room temperature superconducting material
Compressing simple molecular solids with hydrogen at extremely high pressures, University of Rochester scientists have, for the first time, created material that is superconducting at room temperature.

Topological superconducting phase protected by 1D local magnetic symmetries
Scientists from China and USA classified 1D gapped topological superconducting quantum wires with local magnetic symmetries (LMSs), in which the time-reversal symmetry is broken but its combinations with certain crystalline symmetries, such as MxT, C2zT, C4zT, and C6zT, are preserved.

Skoltech and MIPT scientists find a rule to predict new superconducting metal hydrides
The search for coveted high-temperature superconductors is going to get easier with a new 'law within a law' discovered by Skoltech and MIPT researchers and their colleagues, who figured out a link between an element's position in the Periodic Table and its potential to form a high-temperature superconducting hydride.

Scientists created an 'impossible' superconducting compound
Scientists have created new superconducting compounds of hydrogen and praseodymium, a rare-earth metal, one substance being quite a surprise from the perspective of classical chemistry.

Quantum technologies: New insights into superconducting processes
Superconductors are regarded as promising components for quantum computers, but so far they only function at very low temperatures.

Superconducting wind turbine chalks up first test success
A superconducting rotor has been successfully tested on an active wind turbine for the first time.

New design strategy can help improve layered superconducting materials
Tokyo, Japan - Scientists from Tokyo Metropolitan University have created a new layered superconducting material with a conducting layer made of bismuth, silver, tin, sulfur and selenium.

Controlling superconducting regions within an exotic metal
Researchers at EPFL have created a metallic microdevice in which they can define and tune patterns of superconductivity.

Evidence of anomalously large superconducting gap on topological surface state of β-Bi2Pd film
Hong Ding's group from the Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science reported the superconducting gap of topological surface state is larger than that of bulk states in β-Bi2Pd thin films using in-situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and molecular beam epitaxy.

Two advances in understanding the role of 'charge stripes' in superconducting mate
In independent studies, two research teams report important advances in understanding how charge stripes might interact with superconductivity.

Read More: Superconducting News and Superconducting Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.