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Air Force Research Lab scientist wins award for groundbreaking research

August 19, 2009

The Air Force Research Lab (AFRL) announced today that one of its researchers, Dr. Paul Barnes, was selected as the winner of a 2009 Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) award. Barnes received the John L. McLucas Basic Research STEM Award for his outstanding scientific achievements in superconducting materials.

Superconductors are responsible for carrying electric currents without any loss. Barnes' research explored new and innovative ways to make more advanced superconductors through the use of nanotechnology. Electric power applications using these advanced superconductors are more compact, lightweight, and efficient. Lighter and smaller superconductoring power systems are beneficial because they reduce the load on aircraft and weapon systems.

"The AFRL Propulsion Directorate is proud to have Dr. Barnes leading the way in the invention and application of superconductors for improvement of current and next-generation weapon systems. His superior technical skills, prolific publication record, involvement and leadership are tremendous assets to the U.S. Air Force," said Dr. Alan Garscadden, chief scientist, AFRL Propulsion Directorate.

"It's a great research team to be working with at the Air Force Research Laboratory and Air Force Office of Scientific Research. I'm fortunate to be surrounded by talented people where we are afforded the opportunity to make a difference for the future of our country," said Barnes.
-end-
ABOUT AFOSR: The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), located in Arlington, Virginia, continues to expand the horizon of scientific knowledge through its leadership and management of the Air Force's basic research program. As a vital component of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), AFOSR's mission is to discover, shape, and champion basic science that profoundly impacts the future Air Force. To learn more about AFOSR visit www.afosr.af.mil or their Facebook and Twitter pages.

ABOUT AFRL: The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is the heart of science and technology for the United States Air Force. AFRL is responsible for developing the systems crucial to aerospace superiority. With a workforce of approximately 9,600 people, the laboratory's wealth of talented individuals help AFRL lead science and technology development through in-house and contractual programs. Additionally, the laboratory outsources approximately 75% of its budget to industry, academia, and the international community - leveraging the world's knowledge to provide the most innovative science and technology to the Air Force.

Air Force Office of Scientific Research

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