Nav: Home

American Society for Microbiology honors Xiaorong Lin for work on Cryptococcus neoformans

August 19, 2009

The 2009 American Society for Microbiology (ASM) ICAAC Young Investigator Award will be presented to Xiaorong Lin, Assistant Professor, Department of Biology, Texas A & M University, College Station. Sponsored by Merck U.S. Human Health, this award recognizes early career scientists for research excellence in microbiology and infectious diseases.

C. neoformans, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, has a defined sexual cycle with two mating types. In nature and clinical isolates though, one mating type (α) predominates. Dr. Lin's work provided evidence for a modified form of the sexual cycle involving only one mating type suggesting that the population can undergo sexual recombination despite the presence of predominantly only one mating type. This work implies that recombination can produce spores with greater genetic diversity, and it can have profound effects on how pathogenic characteristics appear in a population.

Dr. Lin established her lab at Texas A & M in 2008. Her first independent studies described the use of agrobacterium as a transkingdom mutagenesis tool for Asperigillus fumigatus and showed that pigment mutants are highly virulent in a heterologous host model system.

Dr. Lin received her Ph.D. from the University of Georgia and completed her postdoctoral fellowship at Duke University Medical Center.
-end-
The ICAAC Young Investigator Award will be presented during ASM's 49th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, September 12-15, 2009 in San Francisco, CA. ASM is the world's oldest and largest life science organization and has more than 43,000 members worldwide. ASM's mission is to advance the microbiological sciences and promote the use of scientific knowledge for improved health, economic, and environmental well-being.

American Society for Microbiology

Related Microbiology Articles:

79 Fellows elected to the American Academy of Microbiology
In January of 2015, the American Academy of Microbiology elected 79 new Fellows.
New discovery in the microbiology of serious human disease
Previously undiscovered secrets of how human cells interact with a bacterium which causes a serious human disease have been revealed in new research by microbiologists at The University of Nottingham.
4 cells turn seabed microbiology upside down
With DNA from just four cells, researchers reveal how some of the world's most abundant organisms play a key role in carbon cycling in the seabed.
87 scientists elected to the American Academy of Microbiology
Eighty-seven microbiologists have been elected to Fellowship in the American Academy of Microbiology.
Tips from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology
This release includes information about these articles: Specific Bacterial Species May Initiate, Maintain Crohn's; Bacteria Involved in Sewer Pipe Corrosion Identified; Antibodies to Immune Cells Protect Eyes In Pseudomonas Infection; Dangerous Form of MRSA, Endemic In Many US Hospitals, Increasing in UK.
Tips from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology
Upcoming articles from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology include:
Microbiology brought to life in Nottingham
Antimicrobial insect brains, mouth bacteria behaving badly and the hundreds of microbial communities that lurk in household dust are just some of the highlights at the Society for General Microbiology's autumn meeting in Nottingham next week.
Tips from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology
The following are tips from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology:
Tips from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology
The following are tips from the Journals of the American Society for Microbiology:
New text focuses on microbiology of historic artifacts
Historic and culturally important artifacts, like all materials, are vulnerable to microbial attack.
More Microbiology News and Microbiology Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Clint Smith
The killing of George Floyd by a police officer has sparked massive protests nationwide. This hour, writer and scholar Clint Smith reflects on this moment, through conversation, letters, and poetry.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Nina
Producer Tracie Hunte stumbled into a duet between Nina Simone and the sounds of protest outside her apartment. Then she discovered a performance by Nina on April 7, 1968 - three days after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Tracie talks about what Nina's music, born during another time when our country was facing questions that seemed to have no answer, meant then and why it still resonates today.  Listen to Nina's brother, Samuel Waymon, talk about that April 7th concert here.