Nav: Home

Tackling childhood obesity at the local level -- IOM report releases Sept. 1

August 19, 2009

What steps have public officials in your state or community taken to combat childhood obesity? The percentage of American adolescents who are obese has tripled in just 35 years. Local governments play a crucial role by shaping environments that make it either easy or hard for families to find fresh fruits and vegetables, play outdoors, walk, and otherwise eat healthy and be physically active. LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACTIONS TO PREVENT CHILDHOOD OBESITY, a new report from the Institute of Medicine, offers action steps that officials at the regional and community levels can use to help reduce childhood obesity, one of the most serious and expensive health problems facing the nation.

The release of this report provides an opportunity to examine initiatives taking place across the country. The report highlights 10 examples of how local officials have promoted healthier lifestyles in communities ranging from big cities to small towns.

Public Briefing: Members of the committee that wrote the report will be available to discuss their recommendations and take questions at a public briefing starting at 11 a.m. EDT Tuesday, Sept. 1, in the Lecture Room of the National Academy of Sciences building, 2100 C St., N.W., Washington, D.C. Those who cannot attend may listen to a live audio webcast and submit questions through a link that will be available at www.national-academies.org on Sept. 1.

Participating from the committee that wrote the report:
  • Eduardo J. Sanchez (chair), vice president and chief medical officer, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas
  • Peggy Beltrone, commissioner, Cascade County Commission, Great Falls, Mont.
  • Mary T. Story, professor of epidemiology and community health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Adewale Troutman, director, Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness, Louisville, Ky.
  • Antronette (Toni) K. Yancey, professor of health services, School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles
-end-
Advance copies of the report will be available to reporters only beginning at 9 a.m. EDT on Monday, Aug. 31. THE REPORT IS EMBARGOED AND NOT FOR PUBLIC RELEASE BEFORE 12:01 A.M EDT SEPT. 1. REPORTERS: To obtain a copy of the report or to register for the briefing, contact the Office of News and Public Information; tel. 202-334-2138 or e-mail <news@nas.edu>.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

Related Public Health Articles:

The Lancet Public Health: Ageism linked to poorer health in older people in England
Ageism may be linked with poorer health in older people in England, according to an observational study of over 7,500 people aged over 50 published in The Lancet Public Health journal.
Study: Public transportation use linked to better public health
Promoting robust public transportation systems may come with a bonus for public health -- lower obesity rates.
Bloomberg American Health Initiative releases special public health reports supplement
With US life expectancy now on the decline for two consecutive years, the Bloomberg American Health Initiative is releasing a supplement to Public Health Reports, the scholarly journal of the US Surgeon General.
Data does the heavy lifting: Encouraging new public health approaches to promote the health benefits of muscle-strengthening exercise (MSE)
According to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, almost 75 percent of US adults do not comply with public health guidelines recommending two or more muscle-strengthening exercise (MSE) sessions a week, with nearly 60 percent of the population doing no MSE at all.
The Lancet Public Health: Moderate carbohydrate intake may be best for health
Low-carb diets that replace carbohydrates with proteins and fats from plant sources associated with lower risk of mortality compared to those that replace carbohydrates with proteins and fat from animal sources.
More Public Health News and Public Health Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...