Nav: Home

NSB assembles expert panel to identify and develop stem innovators

August 19, 2009

Join a diverse group of experts from multiple disciplines as they promote U.S. economic well-being and competitiveness through the development of U.S. students with exceptional early potential for mathematics and science achievement into adults who can produce and innovate, especially in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) for a gathering sponsored by the National Science Board (NSB).

WHEN: Monday, Aug. 24, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Tuesday, Aug. 25, 8 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.

WHERE: Room 1235 (Board Room) at the National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd, Arlington, Va.

HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE:
  • Keynote address by the Honorable Arne Duncan, U.S. Secretary of Education (Aug. 25)
  • Panel discussions to address:
    • Cognitive and non-cognitive characteristics of an innovator
    • Development of STEM innovators through the education system
    • Informal learning, cyber-learning and innovative education
    • Identification under-developed pools of STEM talent and the community role in fostering achievement
    • Innovation ecology and entrepreneurship
    • Existing government education programs, program assessment and effective policy design and implementation
See the full agenda: http://www.nsf.gov/nsb/meetings/2009/0824/index.jsp.

Informed by the views of STEM leaders who have gathered for this two-day conference, the NSB's Committee on Education and Human Resources (CEH) and the CEH ad hoc Task Group on the Next Generation of STEM Innovators--composed of NSB members Camilla Benbow, John Bruer, José Marie Griffiths, Louis Lanzerotti and Diane Souvaine--will craft a recommendation-rich white paper for presentation to the full NSB.
-end-
Media representatives are invited to attend all open sessions, subject to provisions of the Government in the Sunshine Act. Journalists interested in attending and covering the meeting and/or interviewing participants, should contact Lisa-Joy Zgorski at 703-292-8311, by COB on Friday, August 21, 2009, to enable security arrangements.

Public visitors must arrange for a visitor's badge in advance in order to attend the event. E-mail nationalsciencebrd@nsf.gov with your name and organizational affiliation to request your badge, which will be ready for pick-up at the visitor's desk on the day of the meeting.

All meeting sessions will be held in room 1235 at NSF headquarters: 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, Va. (Ballston metro stop).

The NSB is the 25-member policymaking body for the National Science Foundation and advisory body to the President and Congress on science and engineering issues. Drawn from universities and industry, and representing a variety of science and engineering disciplines and geographic areas, NSB members are selected for their eminence in research, education, or public service, and records of distinguished service. The NSB has 24 members that serve six-year terms. The 25th member is the NSF Director, an ex officio member of the NSB. For more background on the NSB and its current composition, visit: http://www.nsf.gov/nsb/about/index.jsp.

National Science Foundation

Related Mathematics Articles:

People can see beauty in complex mathematics, study shows
Ordinary people see beauty in complex mathematical arguments in the same way they can appreciate a beautiful landscape painting or a piano sonata.
Improving geothermal HVAC systems with mathematics
Sustainable heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, such as those that harness low-enthalpy geothermal energy, are needed to reduce collective energy use and mitigate the continued effects of a warming climate.
How the power of mathematics can help assess lung function
Researchers at the University of Southampton have developed a new computational way of analyzing X-ray images of lungs, which could herald a breakthrough in the diagnosis and assessment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other lung diseases.
Mathematics pushes innovation in 4-D printing
New mathematical results will provide a potential breakthrough in the design and the fabrication of the next generation of morphable materials.
More democracy through mathematics
For democratic elections to be fair, voting districts must have similar sizes.
More Mathematics News and Mathematics Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...