American Chemical Society webinar focuses on the chemistry of beer and brewing

August 19, 2010

WASHINGTON, Aug. 19, 2010 -- News media and others interested in the chemical sciences are invited to join the next in a series of American Chemical Society (ACS) Webinars™, focusing on the chemistry of beer and brewing.

Scheduled for Thursday, Aug. 26, from 2 - 3 p.m. EDT, the free ACS Webinar™ will feature Charles Bamforth, Ph.D., Professor of Food Science and Technology at University of California, Davis, speaking on Tapping into the Chemistry of Beer and Brewing.

ACS Webinars™ connect you with subject experts and global thought leaders in chemical sciences, management and business to address current topics of interest to scientific and engineering professionals. Each webinar includes a short presentation followed by a Q & A session.

News media and scientists can tune into the conference without charge, but must register in advance.

Bamforth's topic will include:Bamforth has been part of the brewing industry for more than 32 years, and is a Special Professor in the School of Biosciences at the University of Nottingham, England. He was previously Visiting Professor of Brewing at Heriot-Watt University in Scotland. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Brewing & Distilling, Fellow of the Institute of Biology and Fellow of the International Academy of Food Science and Technology. Bamforth is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the American Society of Brewing Chemists, and has published numerous papers, articles and books on beer and brewing.
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The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 161,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

American Chemical Society

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