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A collection of practical algorithms for polynomial inequality proving and discovering

August 22, 2016

Inequalities may seem like no other topic in Mathematics, but in fact, we are confronted with it almost every day -- in things like speed limits, the quota of your monthly mobile data, and the degree of spiciness of a curry dish. Inequalities act as either a boundary or constraint, and are significant and essential tools in diverse disciplines of science, technology and engineering.

Automated Inequality Proving and Discovering is the first book that focuses on practical algorithms for polynomial inequality proving and discovering.

The book mainly focuses on algorithms such as real root counting, real root classification, improved CAD projection, dimension-decreasing algorithm, difference substitution, and so on. All the algorithms are rigorously proved and the implementations are demonstrated by examples in backgrounds such as algebra, geometry, biological science, and computer science.

A summary of the work by the authors and their collaborators on the subject in recent years, Automated Inequality Proving and Discovering is a book not-to-be-missed by those interested in computational real algebraic geometry, optimization and artificial intelligence.

This book retails at US$118 / £98 (hardcover). To know more about the book visit http://www.worldscientific.com/worldscibooks/10.1142/9951
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About World Scientific Publishing Co.

World Scientific Publishing is a leading independent publisher of books and journals for the scholarly, research, professional and educational communities. The company publishes about 600 books annually and about 130 journals in various fields. World Scientific collaborates with prestigious organizations like the Nobel Foundation, US National Academies Press, as well as its subsidiary, the Imperial College Press, amongst others, to bring high quality academic and professional content to researchers and academics worldwide. To find out more about World Scientific, please visit http://www.worldscientific.com. For more information, contact Amanda Yun at heyun@wspc.com

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