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Sleep disorder linked with abnormal lipid levels

August 22, 2018

In the Respirology study, investigators identified strong associations between several measures of OSA severity and higher total cholesterol, higher LDL-cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and lower HDL-cholesterol. Lipid status was influenced by geographical location with the highest total cholesterol concentration recorded in Northern Europe.

The analysis included 8592 adults across Europe who were not diagnosed with hyperlipidaemia and were not taking lipid-lowering drugs.

"Our data clearly suggest that sleep apnoea may have a negative impact on lipid levels, which may in part explain the association between sleep apnoea and increased risk for cardiovascular disease," said senior author Dr. Ludger Grote, of Gothenburg University, in Sweden. "Patients with sleep apnoea therefore need careful management of all cardiovascular risk factors including hyperlipidaema."
-end-
Additional Information

Link to Study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/resp.13372

About Journal

Respirology is a journal of international standing, publishing peer-reviewed articles of scientific excellence in clinical and clinically-relevant experimental respiratory biology and disease. Fields of research include immunology, intensive and critical care, epidemiology, cell and molecular biology, pathology, pharmacology, physiology, paediatric respiratory medicine, clinical trials, interventional pulmonology and thoracic surgery.

The Journal aims to encourage the international exchange of results and publishes papers in the following categories: Original Articles, Editorials, Reviews, and Correspondences.

Respirology is the preferred journal of the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand, has been adopted as the preferred English journal of the Japanese Respiratory Society and the Taiwan Society of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and is an official journal of the World Association for Bronchology and Interventional Pulmonology.

About Wiley

Wiley is a global leader in education and scholarly research. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, combined with our digital learning, assessment and certification solutions help universities, learned societies, businesses, governments and individuals increase the academic and professional impact of their work. For more than 210 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The company's website can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com.

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