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Can work stress contribute to Parkinson's disease risk?

August 22, 2018

Results from a Movement Disorders study suggest that occupational stress is associated with Parkinson's Disease risk, such that having a high-demand occupation is a risk factor and low control is protective.

High job demands were associated with increased Parkinson's Disease risk among men, especially in men with high education. High control was associated with increased risk among individuals with low education, and this association was more pronounced in women.

The study included 2,544,748 Swedes born in 1920 to 1950. During an average follow-up time of 21.3 years, 21,544 new cases of Parkinson's Disease were identified.
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Additional Information

Link to Study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/mds.27439

About Journal

Movement Disorders is a peer-reviewed journal covering all topics of the field - both in clinical and basic science. Subscribers receive supplements on special topics in addition to 14 regular issues of the journal each year.

About Wiley

Wiley is a global leader in education and scholarly research. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, combined with our digital learning, assessment and certification solutions help universities, learned societies, businesses, governments and individuals increase the academic and professional impact of their work. For more than 210 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The company's website can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com.

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