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Study examines relationship between social disparities and benign prostatic hyperplasia

August 22, 2018

In an Andrologia study of 100,000 men in Korea, social disparities--such as low education level and low household income, current or previous use of medical aid health insurance, blue-collar employment or unemployment, divorce, and low social capital of communities--were all linked with a higher prevalence of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a condition that is characterized by an enlarged prostate due to aging, lower urinary tract blockage, and other factors.

The authors noted that developing and disseminating health programs based on the community may contribute to positive perceptions of community and social activities, thus facilitating BPH prevention and improving the quality of life of patients with BPH.
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Additional Information

Link to Study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/and.13125

About Journal

Andrologia provides an international forum for original papers on the current clinical, morphological, biochemical, and experimental status of organic male infertility and sexual disorders in men. The articles inform on the whole process of advances in andrology (including the aging male), from fundamental research to therapeutic developments worldwide. First published in 1969 and the first international journal of andrology, it is a well established journal in this expanding area of reproductive medicine.

And in addition, Andrologia provides articles on anatomy, endocrinology, physiology, and veterinary medicine.

Andrologia is essential reading for scientists in fundamental andrological research, laboratory diagnosticians, veterinarians and clinicians in many fields (most importantly - dermatologists, endocrinologists, gynecologists, oncologists, and urologists.)

About Wiley

Wiley is a global leader in education and scholarly research. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, combined with our digital learning, assessment and certification solutions help universities, learned societies, businesses, governments and individuals increase the academic and professional impact of their work. For more than 210 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The company's website can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com.

Wiley

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