Nav: Home

Shrimp heal injured fish

August 22, 2018

James Cook University scientists in Australia have discovered that shrimp help heal injured fish.

PhD student David Vaughan is working on a project led by Dr Kate Hutson at JCU's Centre for Sustainable Tropical Fisheries and Aquaculture.

He said it was important to know how the shrimp interact with fish, as the team is in the process of identifying the best shrimp species to use to clean parasites from farmed and ornamental fish.

"Between 30 - 50% of farmed fish in Southeast Asia, the largest fish producing region in the world, are lost to parasites.

"We know that shrimp clean parasites from fish and if we can identify a species that does it efficiently, and does no harm, it offers a 'greener' alternative to chemicals," he said.

Mr Vaughan said scientists knew injured fish visited shrimp 'cleaning stations' to have parasites removed - but the question was whether shrimp then took advantage of the injured fish and fed on their wounds.

He said the relationship between cleaner shrimp and their client fish was complicated, with the shrimp known to eat the mucus of the fish and the fish occasionally eating the shrimp.

The scientists used high-definition cameras to record the details of the interaction between the species.

"We found that shrimp did not aggravate existing injuries or further injure the fish," said Mr Vaughan.

He said image analyses showed the cleaner shrimp actually reduced the redness of the injury.

"Injuries in fishes are susceptible to invasion by secondary pathogens like viruses and bacteria, and the reduction in redness by shrimp indicates that cleaner shrimp could reduce infections."

Mr Vaughan said cleaner shrimp are also known to indirectly influence the health of client fishes by reducing stress levels as a function of cleaning - which also increased the ability of the fish to heal.
-end-


James Cook University

Related Parasites Articles:

Deciphering plant immunity against parasites
Nematodes are a huge threat to agriculture since they parasitize important crops such as wheat, soybean, and banana; but plants can defend themselves.
Malaria parasites 'walk through walls' to infect humans
Researchers have identified proteins that enable deadly malaria parasites to 'walk through cell walls' -- a superpower that was revealed using the Institute's first insectary to grow human malaria parasites.
Scientists analyze dispersal of parasites by birds in the Americas
An international study investigates transmission of microorganisms that cause malaria and other diseases from migratory to resident avian species.
What's the buzz on bee parasites?
Published today in the open-access journal GigaScience is an article that presents the genome sequence and analysis of the honey bee parasitic mite T. mercedesae.
Major drug initiatives are best way to curb threat from parasites
Large-scale programmes to treat a life-threatening disease could improve the health of millions despite concerns about their long-term effects, a study suggests.
Promoting parasites
Hiroshima University scientists have identified a new species of parasite infecting an invasive freshwater fish on the subtropical island of Okinawa, Japan.
Sunflower pollen protects bees from parasites
Solitary mason bees specializing on sunflower pollen were not attacked by a common brood-parasitic wasp, which lays eggs in the nests, where its larvae kill bee eggs and eat their pollen provisions.
Trouble with parasites? Just migrate!
The researchers developed a model to explore whether combating infection could, in theory, be a potential benefit of migration.
Bird genomes contain 'fossils' of parasites that now infect humans
In rare instances, DNA is known to have jumped from one species to another.
Common pesticides kill amphibian parasites, study finds
A recent study by Jessica Hua, assistant professor of biological sciences at Binghamton University, and colleagues, explored the effects of six commonly used pesticides on two different populations of a widespread parasite of amphibians.

Related Parasites Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Jumpstarting Creativity
Our greatest breakthroughs and triumphs have one thing in common: creativity. But how do you ignite it? And how do you rekindle it? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on jumpstarting creativity. Guests include economist Tim Harford, producer Helen Marriage, artificial intelligence researcher Steve Engels, and behavioral scientist Marily Oppezzo.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".