Nav: Home

Biomarkers may help better predict who will have a stroke

August 24, 2016

MINNEAPOLIS - People with high levels of four biomarkers in the blood may be more likely to develop a stroke than people with low levels of the biomarkers, according to a study published in the August 24, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

"Identifying people who are at risk for stroke can help us determine who would benefit most from existing or new therapies to prevent stroke," said study author Ashkan Shoamanesh, MD, of McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. "Future research could also investigate whether lowering the levels of these biomarkers or blocking their action could be a way to prevent strokes. However, our study does not provide evidence that these markers are validated well enough to be implemented in clinical practice."

For the study, researchers from the Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health measured the levels of 15 biomarkers associated with inflammation in the blood of people from the Framingham Heart Study Offspring Cohort who had never had a stroke. The 3,224 participants were an average age of 61 at the start of the study and were followed for an average of nine years. During that time, 98 people had a stroke.

Of the 15 biomarkers, four were associated with an increased risk of stroke. People with elevated homocysteine were 32 percent more likely to have a stroke. Those with high vascular endothelial growth factor were 25 percent more likely; those with high ln-C reactive protein were 28 percent more likely; and those with high ln-tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 were 33 percent more likely to have a stroke during the study.

Adding these four biomarkers to an existing method of predicting a person's stroke risk based on factors such as age, sex, cholesterol and blood pressure, called the Framingham Stroke Risk Profile, improved the ability to predict who would develop a stroke.

Shoamanesh noted that the study was observational. It shows a relationship between high levels of the biomarkers and stroke; it does not establish that the high levels cause stroke. He also noted that the biomarkers were measured only once and researchers did not account for infections, chronic diseases or other conditions that could have affected the results. In addition, study participants are mainly of European ancestry and the results may not apply to other populations.
-end-
The study was supported by Framingham Heart Study's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute contract, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institute on Aging and National Institutes of Health.

To learn more about stroke, please visit http://www.aan.com/patients.

The American Academy of Neurology is the world's largest association of neurologists and neuroscience professionals, with 30,000 members. The AAN is dedicated to promoting the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as Alzheimer's disease, stroke, migraine, multiple sclerosis, concussion, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy.

For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit http://www.aan.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and YouTube.

Media Contacts:


Rachel Seroka, rseroka@aan.com, (612) 928-6129
Michelle Uher, muher@aan.com, (612) 928-6120

American Academy of Neurology

Related Stroke Articles:

Retraining the brain to see after stroke
A new study out today in Neurology, provides the first evidence that rigorous visual training restores rudimentary sight in patients who went partially blind after suffering a stroke, while patients who did not train continued to get progressively worse.
Catheter ablations reduce risks of stroke in heart patients with stroke history, study finds
Atrial fibrillation patients with a prior history of stroke who undergo catheter ablation to treat the abnormal heart rhythm lower their long-term risk of a recurrent stroke by 50 percent, according to new research from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute.
Imaging stroke risk in 4-D
A new MRI technique developed at Northwestern University detects blood flow velocity to identify who is most at risk for stroke, so they can be treated accordingly.
Biomarkers may help better predict who will have a stroke
People with high levels of four biomarkers in the blood may be more likely to develop a stroke than people with low levels of the biomarkers, according to a study published in the Aug.
Pre-stroke risk factors influence long-term future stroke, dementia risk
If you had heart disease risk factors, such as high blood pressure, before your first stoke, your risk of suffering subsequent strokes and dementia long after your initial stroke may be higher.
Intervention methods of stroke need to focus on prevention for blacks to reduce stroke mortality
Blacks are four times more likely than their white counterparts to die from stroke at age 45.
Study shows area undamaged by stroke remains so, regardless of time stroke is left untreated
A study led by Achala Vagal, M.D., associate professor at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and a UC Health radiologist, looked at a group of untreated acute stroke patients and found that there was no evidence of time dependence on damage outcomes for the penumbra, or tissue that is at risk of progressing to dead tissue but is still salvageable if blood flow is returned in a stroke, but rather an association with collateral flow -- or rerouting of blood through clear vessels.
Immediate aspirin after mini-stroke substantially reduces risk of major stroke
Using aspirin urgently could substantially reduce the risk of major strokes in patients who have minor 'warning' events.
SAGE launches the European Stroke Journal with the European Stroke Organisation
SAGE, a world leading independent and academic publisher, is delighted to announce the launch of the European Stroke Journal, the flagship journal of the European Stroke Organisation.
The S-stroke or I-stroke?
The year 2016 is an Olympic year. Developments in high-performance swimwear for swimming continue to advance, along with other areas of scientific research.

Related Stroke Reading:

My Stroke of Insight: A Brain Scientist's Personal Journey
by Jill Bolte Taylor (Author)

Stronger After Stroke, Third Edition: Your Roadmap to Recovery
by Peter G Levine (Author)

Caplan's Stroke: A Clinical Approach
by Louis R. Caplan (Editor)

Stroke: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management
by A David Mendelow MB BCh FRCS PhD (Author), Eng H. Lo PhD (Author), Ralph L Sacco MD MS FAHA FAAN (Author), Lawrence KS Wong MD FRCP (Author), Eng H. Lo PhD (Editor), Ralph L Sacco MD MS FAHA FAAN (Editor), Lawrence KS Wong MD FRCP (Editor), James C. Grotta MD (Editor), Gregory W Albers MD (Editor), Joseph P Broderick MD (Editor), Scott E Kasner MD MSCE FRCP (Editor)

Healing the Broken Brain: Leading Experts Answer 100 Questions about Stroke Recovery
by Dr. Mike Dow (Author), David Dow (Author), Megan Sutton CCC-SLP (Contributor)

Puzzles for Stroke Patients: Rebuild Language, Math & Logic Skills to Live a More Fulfilling Life Post-Stroke
by Kalman Toth (Author)

Stroke Rehabilitation: A Function-Based Approach
by Glen Gillen (Author)

Stronger After Stroke: Your Roadmap to Recovery, 2nd Edition
by Peter G. Levine (Author)

Living With Stroke: A Guide for Patients and Their Families
by Richard C. Senelick MD (Author)

Stroke Certification Study Guide for Nurses: Q&A Review for Exam Success (Book + Free App)
by Kathy Morrison MSN RN CNRN SCRN (Author)

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Where Joy Hides
When we focus so much on achievement and success, it's easy to lose sight of joy. This hour, TED speakers search for joy in unexpected places, and explain why it's crucial to a fulfilling life. Speakers include inventor Simone Giertz, designer Ingrid Fetell Lee, journalist David Baron, and musician Meklit Hadero.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#500 500th Episode
This week we turn 500! To celebrate, we're taking the opportunity to go off format, talk about the journey through 500 episodes, and answer questions from our lovely listeners. Join hosts Bethany Brookshire and Rachelle Saunders as we talk through the show's history, how we've grown and changed, and what we love about the Science for the People. Here's to 500 more episodes!