Nav: Home

Study reveals potential biomarkers of cerebral aneurysm risk

August 24, 2018

Expansive arterial remodeling (EAR) comprises a genetically programmed biological response designed to restore homeostatic levels of arterial wall stress after an increase in vessel flow load occurs. The magnitude and rate of EAR reactions relative to local hemodynamic stress fields and the tensile strength of vascular tissue determines whether the process will result in a stable mural structure (adaptive remodeling) or an unstable mural structure that progresses to form an aneurysm (maladaptive remodeling). A recent study published in Current Neurovascular Research reveals the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptive and maladaptive remodeling of cerebral arteries for the first time.

In this study, investigators flow loaded the basilar artery in rats by performing bilateral carotid artery ligation. Flow induced changes in basilar artery morphometry and histology were correlated with changes in mRNA expression and protein expression. Flow induced alterations in mural structure and biology were revealed by comparison of flow loaded basilar arteries with basilar arteries from rats that underwent sham surgery. The adaptive and maladaptive remodeling responses were differentiated by comparing the results from an aneurysm prone inbred strain of rats to an aneurysm resistant inbred strain of rats. The study revealed 24 genes that were differentially expressed between strains in the absence of flow loading (resting state). More than half of these genes have previously been associated with pathological vascular phenotypes, and more than a third have specifically been associated with aneurysmal pathology.

Numerous flow-induced genes were revealed by this study, including a group of 8 genes that showed very strong flow induced expression conserved in both inbred strains. A group of 9 genes showed very strong flow induced expression with major differences between aneurysm prone inbred rats and the aneurysm resistant inbred rats. These genes are considered to play major roles in maladaptive cerebrovascular remodeling responses that lead to mural destabilization and cerebral aneurysm formation. Three of these genes including the Tgfb3, Ldha and Rgs16 genes have specifically been associated with aneurysmal pathology in prior studies.

The newly discovered maladaptive cerebrovascular remodeling genes revealed by this research may enable the development of new diagnostic biomarker tests for patients at increased risk of cerebral aneurysm formation. Such tests may be used to identify patients at risk for cerebral aneurysm formation at a very early stage. In such cases, it may be possible to stabilize or reverse the aneurysm forming process with targeted therapies before clinical complications occur. The products of maladaptive cerebrovascular remodeling genes may eventually prove to be high yield drug targets for targeted arterial wall stabilizing therapies. Such therapies may be particularly beneficial for individuals at high risk of aneurysm formation, including patients with severe hypertension, unilateral carotid artery occlusions, cerebral arteriovenous malformations and aneurysmal cerebral arteriopathies such as Tuberous Sclerosis, Alagille syndrome and Sickle cell disease.
-end-
The article can be obtained from the following link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/163726/article

Bentham Science Publishers

Related Aneurysm Articles:

Advances in the detection of the postoperative progress of abdominal aortic aneurysm
A study published in Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology by a team of researchers from BCN MedTech with the VICOMTech Foundation in San Sebastian, the BioDonostia Health Research Institute and Donostia University Hospital, offers a promising methodology for post-operative CTA time-series registration and subsequent aneurysm biomechanical strain analysis, which correlates with the patient's long-term prognosis.
Can aspirin decrease the rate of intracranial aneurysm growth?
Researchers investigated whether aspirin can aid in the prevention of intracranial aneurysm rupture by hindering aneurysm growth.
Researchers uncover new cause of abdominal aortic aneurysm
Researchers have discovered that a family of lipids (fats) contribute to the development of a serious aortic disease, by driving clotting in the blood vessel wall.
'Aneurysm Number' may help surgeons make treatment decisions
Aneurysms form as abnormal bulges over an artery, and, if ruptured, can lead to serious health complications or even death.
New personal health management tool predicts risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm from DNA
Detecting inherited risk factors for diseases tied to more than a single gene has proved challenging.
Study reveals potential biomarkers of cerebral aneurysm risk
The study reveals specific molecular biological responses involved in flow-induced expansive remodeling of cerebral arteries that may influence differential expression of flowdependent cerebrovascular pathology.
Integrated sensor could monitor brain aneurysm treatment
Implantation of a stent-like flow diverter can offer one option for less invasive treatment of brain aneurysms - bulges in blood vessels -- but the procedure requires frequent monitoring while the vessels heal.
The Lancet: Study questions the benefits of abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in men
Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm -- swelling of the major artery in the abdomen, which can cause sudden death if it ruptures -- may not substantially reduce deaths from the condition, according to a Swedish cohort study of more than 130,000 men published in The Lancet.
Study compares countries' mortality rates after aneurysm surgery
There is substantial international variation in mortality rates after treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysm, or enlargement of the aorta.
Abdominal aortic aneurysm linked to dysregulated tryptophan metabolism, study finds
Researchers have found a link between dysregulated tryptophan metabolism and abdominal aortic aneurysm, a life-threatening vascular disease, according to a new study led by Georgia State University.
More Aneurysm News and Aneurysm Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

In & Out Of Love
We think of love as a mysterious, unknowable force. Something that happens to us. But what if we could control it? This hour, TED speakers on whether we can decide to fall in — and out of — love. Guests include writer Mandy Len Catron, biological anthropologist Helen Fisher, musician Dessa, One Love CEO Katie Hood, and psychologist Guy Winch.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#542 Climate Doomsday
Have you heard? Climate change. We did it. And it's bad. It's going to be worse. We are already suffering the effects of it in many ways. How should we TALK about the dangers we are facing, though? Should we get people good and scared? Or give them hope? Or both? Host Bethany Brookshire talks with David Wallace-Wells and Sheril Kirschenbaum to find out. This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News. Related links: Why Climate Disasters Might Not Boost Public Engagement on Climate Change on The New York Times by Andrew Revkin The other kind...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab