Presidential Event Focuses On Improving Diversity In Science

August 24, 1998

The president of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society, will host a special event on the evening of Aug. 24 to focus on programs and ideas for creating a diverse chemistry workforce -- one in which diversity can be used to solve current and future scientific challenges.

As part of the ACS National Meeting in Boston, Aug. 23-27, "The Future of Chemistry Is All of Us" will feature a session of more than 120 posters by minority chemistry students from across the country, including nine current and former ACS Scholars. In addition, two brief plenary sessions will include addresses by distinguished academicians from Cornell University and University of Maryland. Five breakout sessions will explore under-representation issues, including affirmative action and the political consequences of changing demographics. Some 30 exhibits will highlight programs encouraging minority participation in science. The event will conclude with a reception featuring African-American, American Indian and Hispanic/Latino ethnic dishes.

When

Monday, Aug. 24
7:00 - 10:00 p.m.

Where

Hynes Convention Center, 3rd Level
Plenary and Breakout Sessions--Rm. 301
Exhibit of Programs, Posters, Reception--Ballroom A

Who

Paul H.L. Walter
President, American Chemical Society

Eloy Rodriquez
Professor of Environmental Studies, Cornell University

Freeman A. Hrabowski, III
President, University of Maryland-Baltimore County

More than 120 minority chemistry students presenting posters

For Further Information Contact:

Nancy Blount, (202) 872-4451
August 20-27: Press Room, Convention Center, Room 308
Phone: (617) 351-6808, FAX: (617) 351-6820
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A nonprofit organization with a membership of more than 155,000 chemists and chemical engineers as its members, the American Chemical Society publishes scientific journals and databases, convenes major research conferences, and provides educational, science policy and career programs in chemistry. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.
-end-


American Chemical Society

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