New test needed to assess the quality and safety of sunglasses

August 25, 2016

Revision of standards is needed to test sunglasses quality and establish safe limits for the lenses' UV filters, according to research published in the open access journal Biomedical Engineering OnLine.

Exposure to the sun may deteriorate your sunglasses over time and the lenses may become lighter and so alter the category under which they are classified. It may also diminish the impact resistance of lenses (how 'shatterproof' the lens is). Current national and regional standards require that sunglasses provide levels of UV protection linked to the luminous transmittance, which decides the category of the lenses.

The aging test, used in Europe, Brazil, New Zealand and Australia, calculates the extent to which the lenses' category deteriorates as a result of exposure to the sun. The test exposes sun glasses to a sun simulator for 50 hours at 30cm from a 450 W lamp. The lamp exposure is equivalent to two days in a natural environment on a summer's day, or four days in winter.

Liliane Ventura, the corresponding author, from São Carlos School of Engineering, University of São Paulo, Brazil, said: "50 hours of exposure to the sun simulator equates to 23.5 hours of exposure to natural sun in Sao Paulo in Brazil. Most Brazilians replace their sunglasses every two years. To test the sunglasses are safe to wear for these two years, with the assumption they are worn for a period of two hours a day, they should be tested for 134.6 hours at a distance of 5cm. Although our calculations are mainly based on Brazilian cities, other countries may also benefit, especially those located at similar latitudes."

Exposure will vary among world latitudes, with tropical countries being of most concern, as UV indexes are extremely high in summer and remain high in the winter. Therefore, sunglasses worn in the southern hemisphere may need replacing more often than in those worn in the northern hemisphere.

Liliane Ventura adds: "We need adequate lamp power, exposure time, distance from the bulb and controlled temperature. To overcome the current limitations one may either increase the time the lenses are exposed to the lamp or decrease the distance of the lenses from the lamp. We could also consider using a higher power lamp, switching from a 450W to 1600 W lamp."

A Brazilian national survey indicated that most Brazilians wear the same pair of sunglasses for a minimum of two years for a period of two hours a day. Therefore, the standard must guarantee that the sunglasses are safe over this period.

The study calculations were carried out in 27 Brazilian state capitals and data for 110 national capitals in the northern hemisphere were also included. Calculating the equivalence of the simulator to natural light is an estimate because when an individual wears sunglasses, the lenses are not directly exposed to the sun, as they are usually worn in the vertical position.

Lenses should provide adequate UV filters, because insufficient protection could lead to pathological modifications to the cornea and to the internal structure of the eye. This could cause edema (swelling of the eye which can distort vision), pterygium (growth of pink, fleshy tissue on the white of the eye that can interfere with vision), cataract (clouding of the lens of the eye) and retina damage.
-end-
Media Contact
Alanna Orpen
Junior Press Officer
BioMed Central
T: +44 (0)20 3192 2054
E: alanna.orpen@biomedcentral.com

1. Equivalence Between Solar Irradiance and Solar Simulators in Aging Tests of Sunglasses
Mauro Masili, PhD; Liliane Ventura, PhD
BioMedical Engineering OnLine

During the embargo period, please contact Alanna Orpen for a copy of the article.

After the embargo lifts, the article will be available at the journal website here: https://biomedical-engineering-online.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12938-016-0209-7

Please name the journal in any story you write. If you are writing for the web, please link to the article. All articles are available free of charge, according to BioMed Central's open access policy.

2. The research was supported by the Brazilian founding agency FAPESP.

3. BioMedical Engineering OnLine is aimed at readers and authors throughout the world with an interest in using tools of the physical sciences to advance and understand problems in the biological and medical sciences. There are biomedical engineers in countries throughout the world, and the results of their work are scattered and often difficult to access. This publication promotes the rapid and free accessibility of articles for biomedical engineering researchers everywhere. The result is a worldwide community of biomedical engineers who are linked together by their various research interests and their values in promoting benefits to all of humanity.

4. BioMed Central is an STM (Science, Technology and Medicine) publisher which has pioneered the open access publishing model. All peer-reviewed research articles published by BioMed Central are made immediately and freely accessible online, and are licensed to allow redistribution and reuse. BioMed Central is part of Springer Nature, a major new force in scientific, scholarly, professional and educational publishing, created in May 2015 through the combination of Nature Publishing Group, Palgrave Macmillan, Macmillan Education and Springer Science+Business Media. http://www.biomedcentral.com

BioMed Central

Related Engineering Articles from Brightsurf:

Re-engineering antibodies for COVID-19
Catholic University of America researcher uses 'in silico' analysis to fast-track passive immunity

Next frontier in bacterial engineering
A new technique overcomes a serious hurdle in the field of bacterial design and engineering.

COVID-19 and the role of tissue engineering
Tissue engineering has a unique set of tools and technologies for developing preventive strategies, diagnostics, and treatments that can play an important role during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Engineering the meniscus
Damage to the meniscus is common, but there remains an unmet need for improved restorative therapies that can overcome poor healing in the avascular regions.

Artificially engineering the intestine
Short bowel syndrome is a debilitating condition with few treatment options, and these treatments have limited efficacy.

Reverse engineering the fireworks of life
An interdisciplinary team of Princeton researchers has successfully reverse engineered the components and sequence of events that lead to microtubule branching.

New method for engineering metabolic pathways
Two approaches provide a faster way to create enzymes and analyze their reactions, leading to the design of more complex molecules.

Engineering for high-speed devices
A research team from the University of Delaware has developed cutting-edge technology for photonics devices that could enable faster communications between phones and computers.

Breakthrough in blood vessel engineering
Growing functional blood vessel networks is no easy task. Previously, other groups have made networks that span millimeters in size.

Next-gen batteries possible with new engineering approach
Dramatically longer-lasting, faster-charging and safer lithium metal batteries may be possible, according to Penn State research, recently published in Nature Energy.

Read More: Engineering News and Engineering Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.