Men perceived as younger, more attractive after hair transplant for baldness

August 25, 2016

Does how much hair a man has matter in how he is perceived? The answer is yes, according to a new article published online by JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

A survey by Lisa E. Ishii, M.D., M.H.S., of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, and coauthors suggests men with androgenetic alopecia (pattern baldness) who underwent hair transplant were rated by observers as more youthful, attractive, successful and approachable. All those factors can play a role in workplace and social success.

The authors surveyed 122 people (about 48 percent of whom were men) and participants were asked to rate 13 pairs of images. Seven men in the pictures had hair transplant and six men who did not have hair restoration served as controls for comparison.

Limitations of the study include its small population and study design.

"These findings are relevant in building an evidence-based body of literature surrounding the efficacy of hair transplant in the treatment of AGA [androgenetic alopecia]," the authors conclude.
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To read the full study, please visit the For The Media website.

(JAMA Facial Plast Surg. Published August 25, 2016. doi:10.1001/jamafacial.2016.0546. Available pre-embargo to the media at http://media.jamanetwork.com.)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

The JAMA Network Journals

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