Scientists and artists to search for common ground

August 26, 2005

They may be disciplines at opposite ends of the intellectual spectrum, but science and art will converge at the University of York next month in a quest to discover common ground.

Practitioners from across the world will gather on 5 September 2005 for a three-day conference, hosted by the University, to explore the relationship between science and art and the mutual support artists and scientists can offer within a wider cultural environment.

Rules of Engagement is organised by Arts Council England, Yorkshire in partnership with CNAP, a bioscience research centre at the University of York with additional support from Science City York.

The event - a crucible of talks, events, performances and debate -will pose provocative questions, such as: Head of CNAP, Professor Dianna Bowles said: "We are very pleased to be in partnership with the Arts Council England, Yorkshire and to be hosting this exciting event in York. It is fascinating to explore the ideas arising from the exchanges between science and art, and this conference will benefit CNAP and indeed wider communities in the university sector by giving us insights to the ways in which science can be communicated to many different audiences."

Manager of Science City York, Anna Rooke, said: "We are thrilled that this national conference is taking place in York. It really embodies what Science City York is all about - bringing people together from both creative and science worlds, to learn from each other, challenge traditional thinking and stimulate new opportunities and discoveries. It is particularly relevant because creative technology is the fastest growing area of York's technology base, employing more than 1,000 people in heritage, arts and creative technology enterprises across the City."

Speakers and participants at the conference will include:
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For full details of the conference see www.rulesofengagement.co.uk

Notes for editors:

University of York

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